Lean Cell Advising at AME Spring 2017

ABOUT LEAN CELL ADVISING

Students must sign up for a 30-minute block using iAdvise to prevent long wait times. All advising sessions will be held in Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200. When students arrive, they should have completed all tasks under “Know Before You Go” below.

All students must attend Lean Cell Advising or students may not be able to enroll in courses until Fall 2017. 

LEAN CELL ADVISING + iADVISE

AME Students must sign up for advising with iAdvise. AME has designated a 30-minute block sign up for students. The appointment should only take approximately 10-15 minutes as long as student comes prepared. Please note, all students MUST SIGN-UP FOR A TIME WITH iADVISE IN ORDER TO BE ADVISED.

Follow the simple steps below to sign-up with iAdvise:

  1. Log in to http://iadvise.ou.edu using your 4×4 and password.
  2. Select the Department Level Advisement (AE or ME at the School of Aerosapce and Mechanical Engineering), then select Make Group Appointment. 
  3. Reserve an advising time slot (ex. 12:30 time is for 12:30-1:00pm time slot). You can only reserve one slot.
  4. Arrive at the beginning of your time slot. You will be seen sometime within that 30-minute time frame. The advising session should only take approximately 10-15 minutes if student comes prepared.
  5. If you do not reserve a time slot before attending Lean Cell Advising, you may not be seen if the time slot is full.
iAdvise
download icon iAdvise Step-by-Step
Download the iAdvise step-by-step PDF here:

ADVISING DATES

All AME Lean Cell Advising sessions will take place in the Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200.

  • Returning Seniors & National Merit Scholars: Tuesday, February 28th from 12:00-3:00pm
  • Sophomores & Pre-Med: Wednesday, March 1st from 1:00-4:00pm
  • Juniors: Thursday, March 2nd from 12:00-3:00PM
  • Freshmen: Monday, March 27th from 1:00-4:30PM

Unsure of your academic classification? Go to oZone > click the academic tab > click academic profile > select the current semester

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

  • Prepare a course plan in Degree Navigator by logging on to ozone.ou.edu (The course plans on oZone do not check for pre-requisites nor will it verify courses offered during a specific semester)
  • Bring prepared course plan, degree check sheet and degree flowchart with the classes you have taken checked off, current courses circled and courses you plan to take in Fall 2017 highlighted
  • If you are not prepared upon arrival, your time will not be guranteed
  • A staff member from the Williams Student Services Center will be in attendance to remove your advising hold and answer any enrollment/graduation questions
  • A Pre-Med representative will be in attendance on Wednesday, March 1st

OTHER INFORMATION

Freshmen are required to be advised by their University College, Athletics, or Honors/Scholars Advisor in order to be able to enroll.

Do you have questions or concerns about advising, classes, your current major or school in general?

Please know that aside from Lean Cell Advising, you are encouraged to meet with your College Advisor in the Williams Student Services Center (WSSC) any time you have questions, or concerns you wish to discuss in a one-on-one meeting. Lean Cell Advising is an advising process intended to provide a stream-lined process for meeting with your major faculty advisor while also addressing the multiple steps in theadvising/enrollment system without having to visit multiple offices and staff. HOWEVER, you can, and are encouraged to, meet with your WSSC advisor if you require or would benefit from more in-depth guidance and academic counseling. It’s easy to do! Log into: iadvise.ou.edu to access available appointment times for your specific advisor. Don’t see any openings? Click here to contact your WSSC advisor or call WSSC directly at (405) 325-4096.

Do you have questions about career fairs, graduate school, internships and co-ops? 

WSSC advisors are here to assist you with Career Counseling. We encourage you to take advantage of this guidance as you prepare for your future as an engineer!

QUESTIONS?

For more information or accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Kate O’Brien at kobrien@ou.edu.

Control of a Quadrotor Using Adaptive Control Project

A group of students from Dr. Andrea L’afflitto’s Flight Controls class created the following video:

According to Dr. L’afflitto, this project consisted of designing an autopilot for a quadrotor using some modern, very aggressive control techniques. The purpose of this video is to show the results achieved graphically, however, the mathematical models, the control design problem and the numerical simulations have very deep roots.

“I am extremely proud of their work because these are all undergraduate students, but the quality and the mathematical complexity is the one of a graduate project,” said Dr. L’afflitto. “We all can imagine the impact of the development of such technology, considering the growing attention that OU is putting on the UAS technology.”

Video Transcript:

This video shows the result of a students’’ project developed as part of the AME 4513/5513 “Flight Controls” course at the University of Oklahoma in Fall 2016. A DJI F450 will inspect some buildings of OU’s main campus. The drone’s autopilot implements an algorithm based on Model Reference Adaptive Control.

An important feature of this simulation is that the quadrotor dynamics is not captured by a set of nonlinear differential equations, but it is deduced from a SimMechanics model of a DJI F450. This guarantees high accuracy of the results presented.

The adaptive control technology allows precise, aggressive maneuvers in the vicinity of obstacles, such as buildings.

[VIDEO]

Next, we compare the performance of a quadrotor (in white) implementing an adaptive control law and a quadrotor (in black) implementing a classic PID controller.

[VIDEO]

Created by: Blake Anderson

Riley Cotter

Jordan Logue

Kevin Murray Jr.

Dream Course Guest Seminar: Dr. Michael Zavlanos

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Dr. Michael Zavlanos visited AME on February 2, 2017 as part of Dr. Andrea L’Afflitto’s Dream Course, Modern Control Theory and Applications.

Abstract: Current robotic systems have the potential to accomplish a previously intractable scope of tasks. Their ever growing capabilities will soon allow them to operate autonomously outside the lab, in remote, unpredictable, and uncertain environments, where the presence of humans is dangerous or even impossible. For this to become possible, a fundamental challenge is to develop new methods that will enable teams of robotic sensors to collaboratively explore unknown environments and extract concise actionable information. In this talk,we present a novel approach to dynamically synthesize optimal controllers for a robotic sensor network tasked with estimating a collection of hidden states. The key idea is to divide the hidden states into clusters and then use dynamic programming to determine optimal trajectories around each hidden state as well as how far along the local optimal trajectories the robot should travel before transitioning to estimating the next hidden state within the cluster. Then, a distributed assignment algorithm is used to dynamically allocate controllers to the robot team from the set of optimal control policies at every cluster. Compared to relevant distributed state estimation methods, our approach scales very well to large teams of mobile robots and hidden vectors. We also present a distributed state estimation method that allows mobile sensor networks to estimate a set of hidden states up to a user-specified accuracy. This is done by formulating a LMI constrained optimization problem to minimize the worst case state uncertainty, which we solve in a distributed way using a new random approximate projections method that is robust to the state disagreement errors that exist among the robots as an Information Consensus Filter (ICF) fuses the collected measurements. To our knowledge, even though the distributed active sensing literature is well-developed, the ability to control worst-case estimation uncertainty in a distributed fashion is new. We present numerical simulations and experimental results that show the efficiency of the reposed methods.

Bio: Michael M. Zavlanos received the Diploma in mechanical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens, Greece, in 2002, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. From 2008 to 2009 he was a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He then joined the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, where he remained until 2012. Currently, he is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, Durham, NC. He also holds a secondary appointment in the department of electrical and computer engineering. His research interests include a wide range of topics in the emerging discipline of networked systems, with applications in robotic, sensor, and communication networks. He is particularly interested in hybrid solution techniques, on the interface of control theory, distributed optimization, estimation, and networking. Dr. Zavlanos is a recipient of the 2014 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program (YIP) Award, the 2011 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, as well as Best Student Paper Awards at GlobalSIP 2014 and CDC 2006.

Engineering Students Design and Test Robots

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The course consisted of different terrains and obstacles.

Throughout the fall semester, students taking the pre-capstone AME course, “Principles of Engineering Design” worked on a project that led up to a final performance test. The problem description is created out of a fascinating anthology of problems.

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The students prepped the robots at the starting line.

The students’ task was to design, build and test a robot that has the ability to travel through an obstacle course and end by piercing a Styrofoam board, hopefully popping the balloon housed underneath. The teams were given 2 attempts to complete both aspects of the task with an optional 5-minute break to fix their robot or make alterations.

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Chris Sanders, Pamela Duarte, Dallas Milligan, and Ian Wright choose to take time to fix their robot before their 2nd attempt at the course.

 

Each team consisted of a group of 4-5 interdisciplinary engineering students, ranging from mechanical to petroleum.

 

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According to Senior Mechanical Engineering student Ciore Taylor, the class consisted of lessons about the design and planning phases. Teams initially determined the different skills each person in the group had, then moved on to coming up with different designs, then come to conclude the design process. Students were encouraged to use their imagination when coming up with the designs of the robot.

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The winning teams were announced after each team had the opportunity to test their robots. precapstone-winners-ameprecapstone-winners-ameprecapstone-winners-ame precapstone-winners-ame

Glider Trials with Intro to Aerospace Engineering (AME 2223)

ame-glider-2Dr. Thomas Hays’ Introduction to Aerospace Engineering course tested their model gliders in the Armory on Thursday, December 1, 2016. The student teams choose whether they wish to compete for either range or endurance and then they must predict how far or for how long it will fly.

 

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“It is nice to be able to apply what you have been learning all semester to something as fun as constructing your own glider and testing it,” said Ryan Tullius (pictured left).

 

ame-glider-3 The students had the option to make the gliders out of any materials they want. Some of the common materials used were paperclips, balsa wood, and tape. Many students decorated their glider with different themes as well to represent each team.ame-glider-4

New Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Hamidreza Shabgard

hamidreza-shabgard-bioDr. Hamidreza Shabgard joined AME as an Assistant Professor in the Fall 2016 semester. He completed his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration in thermal-fluid sciences at the University of Connecticut in 2014. Dr. Shabgard holds an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration of energy conversion from the Amirkabir University of Technology (Iran) and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Azad University of Mashhad (Iran).

After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Shabgard took a post-doctoral position at Drexel University, where he worked on advanced dry-cooling technology for power plants. Dr. Shabgard’s research interests include multiphase flow and heat transfer, particulate flow, CFD, thermal energy storage, and heat pipes. His work is focused on the development of efficient and sustainable energy systems through a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics involved in fluid flow and heat transfer, as well as, innovative thermofluidic design.

Dr. Shabgard has big plans for his time at the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, “Energy is critical in our daily lives and is closely tied to environment and natural resources. My work is related to energy and in particular the thermal-fluid systems involved in production, conversion, storage, transfer and management of energy. As a faculty member in AME, I will have the opportunity to work with students and carry out cutting edge research in one of the finest educational institutions.”

Engineering GSC 2016 Poster Fair

AME-GSC-poster-fairPlease join AME in thanking the following graduate students and their mentors for participating in the Engineering Graduate Student Community 2016 Poster Fair organized by the GCOE on November 11, 2016. Of the 24 entries, five were from AME:

 

  1. Arun Balakrishnan: Effect of Fuel Aromatic Content on NOx Emission from Petro/Biodiesel Flames.  Mentors:  Gollahalli and Parthasarathy
  2. Tom Boone.  Operational Losses in Space Launch.  Mentor:  Miller
  3. Flavio Ivan Moreno: Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Three Component Fuel Blends in a Porous Media Burner.  Mentor:  Parthasarathy
  4. Anand Balu Nellippallil: A Goal-Oriented, Sequential Design Method for the Horizontal Integration of a Multi-Stage Hot Rod Rolling System.  Mentors:  Allen (ISE) and Mistree
  5. Dana Saeed: Robust Stimulation Method in Eagle Ford Shale.  Mentors: Pournik (PGE), Siddique and Mistree

Congratulations to Anand Balu Nellippallil for receiving the top award!

 

Student Spotlight: Robert Kunkel

AME-robert-kunkel-blog-2AME undergraduate student, Robert Kunkel, represented OU in Washington, DC at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center and at ANSER.  Mr. Kunkel entered the AME program as a National Merit Scholar and is in his 3rd year of Mechanical Engineering with 18 additional hours for a pre-med emphasis and in the Honors College.

“I wasn’t sure how demanding the internship would turn out to be, but my experiences at OU, both in the classroom and in the practice facility made me confident that I was prepared to handle anything that I encountered,” said Mr. Kunkel.

He applied for the internship at NASA at the OU Job Fair.  In the interview process, he was so highly regarded that they gave him 2 projects instead of one.  He worked with the NASA NIAC team (NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts) at Goddard for a project analyzing all project proposal submissions from 2011-2015. The executives at NASA will use the data from his project for future planning and funding for their programs.

For Mr. Kunkel’s second project, he was loaned to ANSER, a high-level Washington think tank. He was the only NASA intern that did this. His project was to work with a well-respected and published researcher on radiation, Dr. Ron Turner, to research Mitigating radiation on long-term astronauts by sheltering in lunar lava tubes. He is also cited as a co-author on this paper that will be published and presented at a conference in 2017.

He achieved his security clearance for this work and socialized with some of the top scientists in the country as they came to Washington for the NIAC events.  He also has personally read all NIAC proposals submitted by them since 2011.  At the conclusion of the internship, NASA had a ‘Poster Day’ where all the interns display the results of their work over the summer.

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In the future, Mr. Kunkel wants to work in research and development or possibly explore the private sector. He will pursue a master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and is interested in biomedical engineering as an emphasis.

New Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Chung-Hao Lee

chung-hao-lee-bioDr. Chung-Hao Lee was an ICES/AHA postdoctoral fellow in the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at the University of  Texas at Austin. Since 2012, he worked with Professor Michael Sacks on heart valve biomechanics. Previously, he graduated with a B.S. and M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan in 2003 and 2005, respectively, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering (Major in Structural & Computational Mechanics) from UCLA in 2011, working with Professor J.S. Chen on his dissertation on Atomistic to Continuum Modeling of DNA Molecules.

Dr. Lee’s research interests revolve around image-based computational biomechanics, tissue mechanical and microstructural quantifications, structure- based constitutive models for biological tissues, and multiscale materials modeling, with a primary focus on improving patient-specific healthcare of cardiovascular diseases by integrating essential biomechanical processes across molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales.

He is excited for the new research opportunities at OU, “I am looking forward to collaborating with the colleagues in the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and the Gallogly College of Engineering at OU. Collaborative research across disciplines will bring together engineers like me and surgeons and clinicians to facilitate health-related biomedical research.”

Guest Lecture: Design of Active Composites for 4D Printing Applications with Dr. H. Jerry Qi

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AME hosted a guest lecture given by Dr. H. Jerry Qui on Monday, October 24, 2016. Dr. Qi presented his research regarding the design of active composites for 4D printing applications.

Recent advances in multimaterial 3D printing allow the precise placement of multiple materials at micrometer resolution with essentially no restrictions on the geometric complexity of the spatial arrangement. Complex 3D solids thus can be created with highly non-regular material distributions in an optimal fashion, enabling the fabrication of devices with unprecedented multifunctional performance. This also enables the emerging concept of 4D printing.

In his talk, Dr. Qi started with the concept of 4D printing, where he prints a composite in a relatively simple shape; after printing and some thermomechanical programming, the composite can change its shape as a function of time, the 4th dimension of the shape forming process. He further showed different designs to achieve the shape change, such as printed active composites and direct printing shape memory materials. To further enhance the functionality of the 4D printing, Dr. Qi explored the printing of conductive wires that can be used either for electric signal transfer or as heating elements. He investigated how different curing methods of the conductive ink can affect the electric properties as a function of strain.

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Based on the knowledge learned, Dr. Qi can fabricate a stretchable electronic device in a sequential process. He demonstrated a stretchable LED circuit, a heating element for shape memory polymers, and a sensor to detect shape change. This method provides the opportunity to print complex 3D stretchable electronics, which will be integrated with 4D printing for topology transferring devices. Finally, Dr. Qi discussed the challenge and future directions for 4D printing.

Bio: Dr. H. Jerry Qi is Professor and the Woodruff Faculty Fellow in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor degrees and graduate degree from Tsinghua University and a ScD degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After one year postdoc at MIT, he joined the University of Colorado Boulder as an assistant professor in 2004, and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2010. He joined Georgia Tech in 2014 and was promoted to a full professor in 2016.

Prof. Qi’s research is in the broad field of nonlinear mechanics of soft materials and focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of multi-field properties of soft active materials through experimentation and constitutive modeling then applying these understandings to application designs. He and his collaborators have been working on a range of soft active materials, including shape memory polymers, shape memory elastomeric composites, light activated polymers, covalent adaptable network polymers, for their interesting behaviors such as shape memory, light actuation, surface patterning, surface welding, healing, and reprocessing. Recently, he and his collaborators pioneered the 4D printing concept. Prof. Qi is a recipient of NSF CAREER award (2007). He is a member of Board of Directors for the Society of Engineering Science. In 2015, he was elected to an ASME Fellow.