During the week of June 14, 2015, several AME students presented papers at the annual conference for American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) in Seattle, Washington. The ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition is the only conference dedicated to all disciplines of engineering education. It is committed to fostering the exchange of ideas, enhancing teaching methods and curriculum, and providing prime networking opportunities for engineering and technology education stakeholders such as deans, faculty members and industry and government representatives.

ASEE AME Attendees

Pictured from left to right: Madhumitha Ramachandran, M.S. student in industrial and systems engineering; Austin Burrus, senior in mechanical engineering; Dr. Diana Bairaktarova, College of Engineering Assistant Professor; Othman Bawareth, senior in mechanical engineering; and Nooshin Nassr, Ph.D. student in general engineering.

On Monday, June 15th, Ramachandran and Bawareth presented their paper, “Differences in Ethical Decision-Making between Experts and Novices,” in the Engineering Ethics Division. Bairaktarova said they did an excellent job, and she is so proud of them.

Austin Burrus will present today, June 16th. His paper is titled, “The Effect of Multilevel Examples,” which is in the Mechanical Engineering Division and the Thermodynamics, Fluids and Heat Transfer Session.

Nassr will be also present her paper today with Bairaktarova titled, “Special Skills Development in Engineering Students: Identifying Instructional Tools to Incorporate into Existing Curricula,” in the First-Year Program Divisions, Hands-on Projects and Spatial Skills.

Click here for more information about the ASEE Conference.

As the end of the school year came to a close, the AME Graduate Student Community ended it with a bang. They hosted several events at the end of the semester to boost morale during an overwhelmingly busy time of year with finals, project deadlines, approaching internships and graduation.

They held an afternoon of relaxation and yoga techniques led by Amber Kapoor followed by lunch and thanking those graduate students who hosted a seminar during the spring 2015 semester.

GSC_End

Graduate students who hosted a seminar include Mohammad Imran, Mahyar Pourghasemi, Amber Kapoor, Lucas Balmer, Mortaza Saeidi, Maya Pishvar, Mani Razi (not pictured) and Anna Masters (not pictured).

GSC also held a picnic at Reaves Park to enjoy food, treats, time together and getting to know one another’s family and friends.

GSC_Picnic1

GSC_Pinic2

Lastly, GSC took a trip to RedPin Bowling Lounge in Oklahoma City for a weekend outing and some friendly games of bowling.

GSC_RedPin

AME’s GSC had a very active year with many new and successful events. We look forward to seeing what next year will bring the group!

On Thursday, April 30, 2015 the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering hosted the annual Capstone Senior Design Poster Fair in Devon Energy Hall and the ExxonMobil Lawrence G. Rawl Engineering Practice Facility. A total of 28 senior teams participated in the poster fair. These student groups have been working on their capstone research throughout their senior year. Students presented their posters to a group of judges who later selected the outstanding teams in each category. The categories consisted of aerospace engineering, prototype design, studies, testing, interdisciplinary and vehicle design. Click here to see the project summaries.

Aerospace Engineering:

JNB_09671st Place Aerospace Engineering: Design/Build/Fly Speedfest-Cody Shell, Justin Parks, Josiah Lund, Austin Jones and Di Zhu

JNB_09662nd Place Aerospace Engineering: Lockheed Martin Supersonic Business Jet-Corbin Graham, Allison Parker, Kylie Richardson, Ashley Carpenter, Blake Riojas

JNB_09833rd Place Aerospace Engineering: Northrop Grumman Scale Model of Reusable Spaceplane-Jared Repplinger, Andrew Hawkins, Evgeniy Ilichev, Resen Praytor, Kegan Duplechin

Mechanical Engineering:

JNB_0938Outstanding Prototype Design: Baker Hughes Alternate Closure Mechanisms for Safety Valves-Antonio Marquez, Andrew Roberts, Patrick Wood, Jeffrey Walker, William Maez

JNB_0942Outstanding Prototype Design: Trek Bicycle Corporation Pedal-Centered Sealed Gearbox System-William Cook, Morgan Andersen, Allicyn Berka, Clayton Stich

JNB_0952Outstanding Interdisciplinary: Baker Hughes Production Decline in Shale Wells-Eric Douglas and Bryan Bodie

JNB_0948Outstanding Vehicle Design: Sooner Off Road-Ray King and James Patrick Dunbar

JNB_0946Outstanding Testing: Schlumberger Design of an Experimental Setup to Measure High Temperature Shear Strength of Polymeric Materials-Robert Marcham, Brian Rockwell, Braden Hobaugh, John Shetley, Mohammed Abu Alrahi

JNB_0944Outstanding Studies: Cameron Valve Seat Analysis and Redesign-Conor McBride, Daniel McCaskill, Melissa Oestmann, Benjamin Schoen and Joshua Woodward

To view the full album from the poster fair, please click here.

Congratulations to all the outstanding groups and all the seniors on their success as undergraduates at OU and AME. We wish you the best in your future endeavors and your engineering careers!

BOA SP 15 Cropped

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Board of Advisors attended their annual spring meeting on Friday, April 24, 2015. The BOA had a busy day with a full agenda. They held their meeting in the Hitachi Conference Room in Felgar Hall. In addition, they attended the Senior Luncheon at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Dave Bert, BOA Chair, was the keynote speaker for the event. Thank you to all for making the day a success!

DSC_3618On Wednesday, April 15, 2015, Dr. Raman P. Singh visited AME for a seminar presentation. His seminar  was titled, Quantitative Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool to Study Heterogeneous Materials.

Dr. Singh visited from Oklahoma State University where he is the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of the Helmerich Research Center and C.F. Colcord Professor in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.

Bio: Dr. Raman P. Singh is a C.F. Colcord Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and currently serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University. He is also the Director of the Helmerich Research Center at the OSU-Tulsa campus. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from the University of Rhode Island and a B.Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology from Kanpur, India. Prior to joining OSU in 2006, Singh was a faculty member at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Before working in New York, he was a post-doctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology.
Singh’s academic interests are in student mentorship, development and retention with a focus on new pedagogical methods. His research interests are in the mechanics of advanced materials with an emphasis on the investigation of modern engineered materials and development of new techniques for mechanical characterization at highly localized length scales. Besides academia, Raman enjoys road-trips, being a life-long student, photography and spending time with his two daughters.

Abstract: This seminar presented the use of quantitative atomic force microscopy based indentation to characterize the mechanical properties of a carbon fiber–epoxy matrix interphase at highly localized length scales. Atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool for qualitative characterizations of material surfaces. Nonetheless, its application to quantitative measurements is hampered by various technical issues. Accordingly, the talk will discuss how issues such as spring calibration, tip geometry, surface roughness and substrate effects were taken into account to obtain accurate quantitative mechanical proper ties of interphase region.
Lastly, the seminar discussed the use of surrogate modeling to characterize non-linear viscoelastic materials based on inverse analysis of indentation data. In this form, the technique can be extended to study mechanical properties complex biological structures such as the ear-drum (or tympanic membrane) or the heart wall.

On Monday, April 6, 2015, the Space Systems and Mission Design class of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering hosted Mr. Keith Reiley, a Boeing Project Manager. Mr. Reiley spoke with students about current projects and advancements in the space industry, including some current projects at Boeing. Mr. Reiley is a University of Oklahoma graduate from 1982 with a degree in Engineering Physics.

Keith Reiley is currently the Boeing Commercial Crew Transportation System Program Manager. He has been managing the development efforts for Boeing’s Commercial Crew program since it’s inception in 2009. Prior to working at Boeing, Mr. Reiley was Director of the NASA ISS Mission Integration office, responsible for overall configuration and assembly planning, management of assembly missions and integration of international partners.

Tecaid LogoThe School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma was selected in late February to participate in a program called Transforming Engineering Culture to Advance Inclusion and Diversity (TECAID). As part of the program’s initiative, TECAID selected five U.S. Mechanical Engineering departments from across the country who are working to improve diversity and inclusion related to race, gender and other social identities and that wished to benefit from an infusion of support and expertise.

“We, at AME, were thrilled to be selected for the TECAID program, because we have a vision of a fully inclusive mechanical engineering program and we see this as a great opportunity to help us reach that goal,” said Rebecca Norris, AME’s office manager and member of the TECAID team.

As part of the TECAID program, each department will define a diversity and inclusion change project and work together toward achieving their goals. Expected departmental outcomes include more diversity, less bias, greater inclusion and a more informed, responsible academic citizenry in matters of gender, race, sexual orientation and other social identities. Participation in this program means that the team from AME will attend three workshops over the next year and will also meet online.

“I am very excited about our participation in the TECAID program as one of the five mechanical engineering departments in the nation,” said Altan. “The program will give us a tremendous opportunity to transform engineering culture to advance inclusion and diversity. We have formed an outstanding AME team who will work with the national leaders to develop and implement effective strategies to enhance the recruitment, retention and success of underrepresented groups in mechanical engineering at OU.”

AME’s department team includes AME Director M. Cengiz Altan, Associate Professor J. David Baldwin, Associate Professor Wilson Merchan-Merchan, Professor Zahed Siddique and Rebecca Norris. This team will rely heavily on input from faculty members, especially female colleagues and those from underrepresented groups. AME believes the transformation of our school has to be driven from within, with the perception that the “majority” is driving the change.

“The TECAID program will help us discover more effective ways to recruit and retain underrepresented students in mechanical engineering to ensure that we are providing learning opportunities to top students from all groups,” said Siddique.

Please click here for more information.

KumarAME Seminar Series and Southwest Mechanics Lecture Series invites you to Dr. Vijay Kumar’s seminar presentation, “Aerial Robot Swarms.” Kumar will begin the seminar at 10:30am in the Hitachi Conference Room located in 214 Felgar Hall on Thursday, February 26, 2015. Kumar is a UPS Foundation Professor for the School of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, School of Computer and Information Science and the School of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.

Abstract: Autonomous micro aerial robots can operate in three-dimensional, indoor and outdoor environments and  have applications to search and rescue first response and precision farming. I will describe the challenges in developing small, agile robots and the algorithmic challenges in the areas of (a) control and planning, (b) state estimation and mapping and (c) coordinating large teams of robots.

Bio: Dr. Vijay Kumar is the UPS Foundation Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Kumar received his B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1987. He has been on the Faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics with a secondary appointment in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Kumar has served in various leadership positions including the Deputy Dean for Research in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and then served as the Deputy Dean for Education in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2008-2012. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Kumar’s research interests are in robotics, specifically multi-robot systems, and micro aerial vehicles. He has served on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and the Springer Tract in Advanced Robotics (STAR). Kumar is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a Fellow of the Institution of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

This seminar presentation is sponsored by ConocoPhillips. Refreshments provided.

For more information, please click here.

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Danielle Geier (405) 325-1715 or dgeier@ou.edu.

KalidindiAME Seminar Series welcomes Dr. Surya R. Kalidindi for the first seminar of the new year. Kalidindi is a Professor at the School of Computational Science and Engineering as well as the School of Materials Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Kalidindi will begin his seminar presentation at 10:30am in the Hitachi Conference Room located in 214 Felgar Hall. His presentation is titled, “Data Science Approaches for Mining Structure-Property-Processing Linkages from Large Datasets.”

Abstract: Materials with enhanced performance characteristics have served as critical enablers for the successful development of advanced technologies throughout human history and have contributed immensely to the prosperity and well-being of various nations. Although the core connections between the material’s internal structure, its evolution through various manufacturing processes and its macroscale properties in service are widely acknowledged to exist, establishing this fundamental knowledge base has proven effort-intensive, slow and very expensive for a number of candidate material systems being explored for advanced technology applications. It is anticipated that the multi-functional performance characteristics of a material are likely to be controlled by a relatively small number of salient features in its microstructure. However, cost-effective validated protocols do not yet exist for fast identification of these salient features and establishment of the desired core knowledge needed for the accelerated design, manufacture and deployment of new materials in advanced technologies. The main impediment arises from lack of a broadly accepted framework for a rigorous quantification of the material’s internal structure and objective identification of the salient features in the microstructure that control the properties of interest. Materials Informatics focuses on the development of data science algorithms and computationally efficient protocols capable of mining the essential linkages in large multiscale materials datasets (both experimental and modeling) and building robust knowledge systems that can be readily accessed, searched and shared by the broader community. Given the nature of the challenges faced in the design and manufacture of new advanced materials, this new emerging interdisciplinary field is ideally positioned to produce a major transformation in the current practices. The novel data science tools produced by this emerging field promise to significantly accelerate the design and development of new advanced materials through their increased efficacy in gleaning and blending the disparate knowledge and insights hidden in “big data” gathered from multiple sources. Our ongoing research has outlined a specific strategy for data science enabled development of new/improved materials and key components of the proposed overall framework are illustrated with examples.

Bio: Surya R. Kalidindi earned a B.Tech. in Civil Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After his graduation from MIT in 1992, Surya joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Drexel University as an Assistant Professor, where he served as the Department Head during 2000-2008. Under his leadership, the department experienced tremendous growth and was ranked 10th nationally among Materials Science and Engineering programs by Academic Analysts in 2006. In 2013, Surya accepted a new position as a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the George W. Woodruff School at Georgia Institute of Technology, with joint appointments in the School of Computational Science and Engineering and in the School of Materials Science and Engineering. Surya’s research efforts over the past two decades have made seminal contributions to the fields of crystal plasticity, microstructure design, spherical nanoindentation and materials informatics. His work has produced about 200 journal articles, four book chapters and a new book on Microstructure Sensitive Design. His work is well cited by peer researchers as reflected by an h-index of 48 and current citation rate of about 1000 citations/year. He has recently been awarded the Alexander von Humboldt award in recognition of his lifetime achievements in research.

This seminar presentation is sponsored by ExxonMobil. Refreshments provided.

For more information, please click here.

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Danielle Geier (405) 325-1715 or dgeier@ou.edu.

A MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR:

Greetings from the OU School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. It’s been a busy year with exciting developments in research, renovation, student success and faculty accomplishments. I would now like to share with you our annual e-newsletter for 2014.
Happy Holidays from all of us at AME!
Best regards,
Altan medium black copy

 

Newsletter_Cover_MyEmmaJ

Click Here to Read

 

 

Next Page →

Follow

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.