DSC_3618On Wednesday, April 15, 2015, Dr. Raman P. Singh visited AME for a seminar presentation. His seminar  was titled, Quantitative Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool to Study Heterogeneous Materials.

Dr. Singh visited from Oklahoma State University where he is the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of the Helmerich Research Center and C.F. Colcord Professor in the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology.

Bio: Dr. Raman P. Singh is a C.F. Colcord Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and currently serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology at Oklahoma State University. He is also the Director of the Helmerich Research Center at the OSU-Tulsa campus. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from the University of Rhode Island and a B.Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology from Kanpur, India. Prior to joining OSU in 2006, Singh was a faculty member at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Before working in New York, he was a post-doctoral scholar at the California Institute of Technology.
Singh’s academic interests are in student mentorship, development and retention with a focus on new pedagogical methods. His research interests are in the mechanics of advanced materials with an emphasis on the investigation of modern engineered materials and development of new techniques for mechanical characterization at highly localized length scales. Besides academia, Raman enjoys road-trips, being a life-long student, photography and spending time with his two daughters.

Abstract: This seminar presented the use of quantitative atomic force microscopy based indentation to characterize the mechanical properties of a carbon fiber–epoxy matrix interphase at highly localized length scales. Atomic force microscopy is a valuable tool for qualitative characterizations of material surfaces. Nonetheless, its application to quantitative measurements is hampered by various technical issues. Accordingly, the talk will discuss how issues such as spring calibration, tip geometry, surface roughness and substrate effects were taken into account to obtain accurate quantitative mechanical proper ties of interphase region.
Lastly, the seminar discussed the use of surrogate modeling to characterize non-linear viscoelastic materials based on inverse analysis of indentation data. In this form, the technique can be extended to study mechanical properties complex biological structures such as the ear-drum (or tympanic membrane) or the heart wall.

On Monday, April 6, 2015, the Space Systems and Mission Design class of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering hosted Mr. Keith Reiley, a Boeing Project Manager. Mr. Reiley spoke with students about current projects and advancements in the space industry, including some current projects at Boeing. Mr. Reiley is a University of Oklahoma graduate from 1982 with a degree in Engineering Physics.

Keith Reiley is currently the Boeing Commercial Crew Transportation System Program Manager. He has been managing the development efforts for Boeing’s Commercial Crew program since it’s inception in 2009. Prior to working at Boeing, Mr. Reiley was Director of the NASA ISS Mission Integration office, responsible for overall configuration and assembly planning, management of assembly missions and integration of international partners.

Tecaid LogoThe School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma was selected in late February to participate in a program called Transforming Engineering Culture to Advance Inclusion and Diversity (TECAID). As part of the program’s initiative, TECAID selected five U.S. Mechanical Engineering departments from across the country who are working to improve diversity and inclusion related to race, gender and other social identities and that wished to benefit from an infusion of support and expertise.

“We, at AME, were thrilled to be selected for the TECAID program, because we have a vision of a fully inclusive mechanical engineering program and we see this as a great opportunity to help us reach that goal,” said Rebecca Norris, AME’s office manager and member of the TECAID team.

As part of the TECAID program, each department will define a diversity and inclusion change project and work together toward achieving their goals. Expected departmental outcomes include more diversity, less bias, greater inclusion and a more informed, responsible academic citizenry in matters of gender, race, sexual orientation and other social identities. Participation in this program means that the team from AME will attend three workshops over the next year and will also meet online.

“I am very excited about our participation in the TECAID program as one of the five mechanical engineering departments in the nation,” said Altan. “The program will give us a tremendous opportunity to transform engineering culture to advance inclusion and diversity. We have formed an outstanding AME team who will work with the national leaders to develop and implement effective strategies to enhance the recruitment, retention and success of underrepresented groups in mechanical engineering at OU.”

AME’s department team includes AME Director M. Cengiz Altan, Associate Professor J. David Baldwin, Associate Professor Wilson Merchan-Merchan, Professor Zahed Siddique and Rebecca Norris. This team will rely heavily on input from faculty members, especially female colleagues and those from underrepresented groups. AME believes the transformation of our school has to be driven from within, with the perception that the “majority” is driving the change.

“The TECAID program will help us discover more effective ways to recruit and retain underrepresented students in mechanical engineering to ensure that we are providing learning opportunities to top students from all groups,” said Siddique.

Please click here for more information.

KumarAME Seminar Series and Southwest Mechanics Lecture Series invites you to Dr. Vijay Kumar’s seminar presentation, “Aerial Robot Swarms.” Kumar will begin the seminar at 10:30am in the Hitachi Conference Room located in 214 Felgar Hall on Thursday, February 26, 2015. Kumar is a UPS Foundation Professor for the School of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, School of Computer and Information Science and the School of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.

Abstract: Autonomous micro aerial robots can operate in three-dimensional, indoor and outdoor environments and  have applications to search and rescue first response and precision farming. I will describe the challenges in developing small, agile robots and the algorithmic challenges in the areas of (a) control and planning, (b) state estimation and mapping and (c) coordinating large teams of robots.

Bio: Dr. Vijay Kumar is the UPS Foundation Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Kumar received his B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1987. He has been on the Faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics with a secondary appointment in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1987. Kumar has served in various leadership positions including the Deputy Dean for Research in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and then served as the Deputy Dean for Education in the School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2008-2012. He also served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Kumar’s research interests are in robotics, specifically multi-robot systems, and micro aerial vehicles. He has served on the editorial boards of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, ASME Journal of Mechanical Design, the ASME Journal of Mechanisms and Robotics and the Springer Tract in Advanced Robotics (STAR). Kumar is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a Fellow of the Institution of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

This seminar presentation is sponsored by ConocoPhillips. Refreshments provided.

For more information, please click here.

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Danielle Geier (405) 325-1715 or dgeier@ou.edu.

KalidindiAME Seminar Series welcomes Dr. Surya R. Kalidindi for the first seminar of the new year. Kalidindi is a Professor at the School of Computational Science and Engineering as well as the School of Materials Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Kalidindi will begin his seminar presentation at 10:30am in the Hitachi Conference Room located in 214 Felgar Hall. His presentation is titled, “Data Science Approaches for Mining Structure-Property-Processing Linkages from Large Datasets.”

Abstract: Materials with enhanced performance characteristics have served as critical enablers for the successful development of advanced technologies throughout human history and have contributed immensely to the prosperity and well-being of various nations. Although the core connections between the material’s internal structure, its evolution through various manufacturing processes and its macroscale properties in service are widely acknowledged to exist, establishing this fundamental knowledge base has proven effort-intensive, slow and very expensive for a number of candidate material systems being explored for advanced technology applications. It is anticipated that the multi-functional performance characteristics of a material are likely to be controlled by a relatively small number of salient features in its microstructure. However, cost-effective validated protocols do not yet exist for fast identification of these salient features and establishment of the desired core knowledge needed for the accelerated design, manufacture and deployment of new materials in advanced technologies. The main impediment arises from lack of a broadly accepted framework for a rigorous quantification of the material’s internal structure and objective identification of the salient features in the microstructure that control the properties of interest. Materials Informatics focuses on the development of data science algorithms and computationally efficient protocols capable of mining the essential linkages in large multiscale materials datasets (both experimental and modeling) and building robust knowledge systems that can be readily accessed, searched and shared by the broader community. Given the nature of the challenges faced in the design and manufacture of new advanced materials, this new emerging interdisciplinary field is ideally positioned to produce a major transformation in the current practices. The novel data science tools produced by this emerging field promise to significantly accelerate the design and development of new advanced materials through their increased efficacy in gleaning and blending the disparate knowledge and insights hidden in “big data” gathered from multiple sources. Our ongoing research has outlined a specific strategy for data science enabled development of new/improved materials and key components of the proposed overall framework are illustrated with examples.

Bio: Surya R. Kalidindi earned a B.Tech. in Civil Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After his graduation from MIT in 1992, Surya joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Drexel University as an Assistant Professor, where he served as the Department Head during 2000-2008. Under his leadership, the department experienced tremendous growth and was ranked 10th nationally among Materials Science and Engineering programs by Academic Analysts in 2006. In 2013, Surya accepted a new position as a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the George W. Woodruff School at Georgia Institute of Technology, with joint appointments in the School of Computational Science and Engineering and in the School of Materials Science and Engineering. Surya’s research efforts over the past two decades have made seminal contributions to the fields of crystal plasticity, microstructure design, spherical nanoindentation and materials informatics. His work has produced about 200 journal articles, four book chapters and a new book on Microstructure Sensitive Design. His work is well cited by peer researchers as reflected by an h-index of 48 and current citation rate of about 1000 citations/year. He has recently been awarded the Alexander von Humboldt award in recognition of his lifetime achievements in research.

This seminar presentation is sponsored by ExxonMobil. Refreshments provided.

For more information, please click here.

For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Danielle Geier (405) 325-1715 or dgeier@ou.edu.

A MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR:

Greetings from the OU School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. It’s been a busy year with exciting developments in research, renovation, student success and faculty accomplishments. I would now like to share with you our annual e-newsletter for 2014.
Happy Holidays from all of us at AME!
Best regards,
Altan medium black copy

 

Newsletter_Cover_MyEmmaJ

Click Here to Read

 

 

DSC_0193

The students of the course User-Centered Design along with their professors Dr. Diana Bairaktarova and Dr. Zahed Siddique explored design-thinking, innovation, creativity, prototyping, empathic and verification design throughout the semester. The focus of the course was learning and experiencing design as a space rather than a step by step process with a toy prototype as a course project.

The students individually applied their knowledge from the course on a toy design project. They created blueprints for the design, a prototype of the toy and an informational poster about the toy. Students hosted a Toy Fair for others to view their toys and meet the designers. The toys along with their posters and the designers’ biographies are now on display for the months of December and January in the main lobby of the Bizzell Library.

DSC_0158

DSC_0169

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To view more photos of the Toy Fair, please click here.

Recently the Mechanical Engineering Capstone students were given a task. The task was to design, build and test a SHARK system capable of moving over land a distance of eight feet, and then enter a harbor. The SHARK must cover the eight feet as rapidly as possible. Upon entering the ‘harbor’ the SHARK must retrieve as much Klepp as possible within set time limits.

The design and construction of the SHARK were subject to the restrictions and conditions.

Restrictions

  • The design must start and operate with one switch
  • The design must be completely autonomous
  • The design must be self-contained
  • The total system weight (dry) should not exceed 5lbs
  • The system at rest should fit in an imaginary cube
    • 1 ft. X 1 ft. X 1 ft.

Performance Tests

The performance of SHARK was tested in two areas:

  • Land speed – this event measured the speed of the SHARK over a distance of eight feet. The course began at a start line eight feet away from the ‘harbor’ and finished in the ‘harbor.’ Timing began when the foremost part of the SHARK crossed the start line and ended when the SHARK entered the pool.
  • Retrieval rate – this was a measure of how much Klepp the SHARK could retrieve. Upon entering the water, the SHARK had two minutes to retrieve as much Klepp as possible. In the test, Klepp was represented by Styrofoam packing ‘peanuts.’ The number of peanuts collected or retrieved by the SHARK in two minutes was counted and expressed as a rate: Klepp retrieval per minute.

Each group was allowed to put their SHARK through the test twice. Groups were allowed two minutes to set up for a test and one minute to remove their device from the testing area.

Scoring was completed for points of land speed and points for retrieval rate. The total points for a test was the sum of the land speed and retrieval rate minus deductions due to penalties, i.e. The final score for a group was the highest from the two tests. Lastly, the group with the most points was announced as winners of the competition. The winning team consisted of Jacob Pickle, Scott Maxwell, Brooke Hitt, Lars Glasemann, and Jackson Autrey. Congratulations!

Winning Team

The winning team with their SHARK.

DSC_0983

DSC_1044

The team overlooks the judge as he counts the ‘Klepp.’

 

ReidOn Tuesday, November 25, 2014, Dr. Tahira Reid visited AME for a seminar presentation. Her seminar presentation was titled, “The Influence of Social and Cultural Considerations on Engineering and Design.”

Abstract: In this talk, Dr. Reid will discuss two projects to illustrate how social and cultural considerations influence design methods. In the Beauty of Mechanical Engineering project, Dr. Reid and her students are conducting experiments to understand how heat moves through curly hair and the mechanisms that cause permanent structural changes in the hair (i.e., heat damage). Currently, trained professionals in the hair industry cannot predict when heat damage will occur and often rely on heuristics and intuition in their hair care approaches. In addition, scientists that have conducted studies with heat and hair have often used Caucasian hair which cannot be generalized to all ethnic groups; they have also conducted experiments that are not ecologically consistent with individuals’ use context. As a result, a number of lay scientists have emerged whose use of contexts are ecologically valid, but are lacking the experimental and quantitative rigor that engineers can provide. With hair care being a multi-billion dollar industry and having meaning for a vast majority of the population, research of this kind is important. In the Socially Conscious Design project, Dr. Reid and her students are exploring ways that compassion can help with problem framing and enhancing design solutions. There are some product interactions, namely in medical environments, in which the design of a product/system elicits fear and anxiety within individuals. The ultimate goal of this research is to use interdisciplinary methods to examine ways in which these emotional needs can be considered during the design process.

Bio: Dr. Tahira N. Reid is an Assistant Professor in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University and is the director of the Research in Engineering and Interdisciplinary Design (REID) Laboratory. Her research interests include developing methods that help engineers think critically about non-technical issues and their impact on engineered design solutions. Prior to arriving at Purdue in 2011, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Mechanical Engineering department at Iowa State working in the Interdisciplinary Research in Sustainable (IRIS) Design Laboratory under the mentorship of Erin MacDonald. In 2010, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in Design Science, with Mechanical Engineering and Psychology as her focus areas. Dr. Reid received both her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2000 and 2004, respectively. She received national attention for patenting a childhood invention: a Double Dutch jump rope device. In 2000, she exhibited her device at the Smithsonian during the Playful Mind’s exhibit and demonstrated it on NBC’s Today Show. Her story has been featured in numerous news media sources and is featured in two children’s books.

On October 25, 2014 students of OU’s American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) attended the Society of Flight Test Engineer’s Symposium at the Worthington Hotel in Fort Worth, Dallas. The symposium was attended by companies like Bell Helicopter, Lockheed Martin, Bombardier and Scaled Composites. The event was directed by the high level test engineering field engineers and was an eye-opening experience for the students.

SFTE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This was the greatest opportunity of my college career to meet and socialize with industry professionals.”- Josiah Lund, President AIAA

In addition to the symposium, the students also had the opportunity to visit the Lockheed Martin to see the F35 Assembly Line and Simulators. Several students also went to Love Field to visit the Maintenance and Engineering Department of Southwest Airlines. These events are very important to both inspire the students and also create valuable relationships with potential mentors in the industry.

“I really like that our sophomores were able to visit a company. The F35 line was exhilarating!” – Bipin Varghese, PR AIAA

SFTE

Next Page →

Follow

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.