The Sooner Off-Road team competed in SAE Baja, an international vehicle design competition held by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The team competed against more than 100 teams from around the world to design and create an off-road vehicle accepted for manufacture by a fictitious firm. The project simulated a real-world engineering design project that involved planning, designing, manufacturing, testing, generating financial support, and working with team members who have diverse academic backgrounds.

The 2016-2017 team finished 36th place overall out of 110 teams at the 2017 Kansas competition, which is two consecutive years of double-digit improvement in final placement.  The team achieved a personal best performance in the suspension event, finishing in 6th place, and dramatic improvements in both the acceleration (30th place) and maneuverability (30th )place) events.  The team successfully finished the four-hour endurance race for the second consecutive year.

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Front Row, L to R: Ryan Hill, Kelsey Chofey, Zac Watkins, Haley Ricks Back Row, L to R: Bryson Simer, Richard Perry, Chris Bilings, Dr. Chris Dalton, Bradley Alex, Evan Stone (captain), Matt Muhlinghause, Mr. Jimmy Cannon

 

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering held the annual Senior Design Poster Fair on May 4, 2017. Thirty-eight student teams presented the capstone posters to a panel of judges, who are alumni of AME and industry professionals. The judges determine the overall high scores and the winners of each respective category: interdisciplinary, prototype, studies, testing and vehicle.
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Overall 1st Place
“Surfboard”
Student Team: Beau Bellamy, Brandon Groh, Andres Perilla, Cameron Fielden
Sponsor: Dr. Stalford                     Advisor: Dr. Stalford

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Overall 2nd Place
“Paint Booth/Hangar Pressure Drop Electronic Monitoring”
Student Team: Andrew Nantze, Ian Wright
Sponsor: GCoE/OC-ALC            Advisor: Dr. Hekiri

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Overall 3rd place
“Stator Build Process Lean-Out”
Student Team: Juliana Shindler, Grant Brann
Sponsor: GE Oil & Gas            Advisor: Dr. Stalford

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Overall 4th place
“Rotary Electro-Mechanical System”
Student Team: Hassan AlDarwish, Saeed Alzaki, Kevin Song, Calhoun John, Mansur Brandon
Sponsor: Schlumberger                 Advisor: Dr. Siddique

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Overall 5th place
“Sooner Racing Team”
Student Team: Samuel Faux, Zachary Maxwell, Wesley Reynolds, Ryan Miller, Connor Millican
Sponsor: OU                    Advisor: Dr. Siddique

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Interdisciplinary Project Outstanding Group 1st Place
“Paint Booth/Hangar Pressure Drop Electronic Monitoring”
Student Team: Andrew Nantze, Ian Wright
Sponsor: GCoE/OC-ALC            Advisor: Dr. Hekiri

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Interdisciplinary Project Outstanding Group 2nd Place
“Stator Build Process Lean Out”
Student Team: Juliana Shindler, Grant Brann
Sponsor: GE Oil & Gas            Advisor: Dr. Stalford

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Interdisciplinary Project Outstanding Group 3rd Place
“Process Documentation Lean Out”
Student Team: Dami Ajijolaiya, Maggy Chestnut, Hiep Chuong, Kaleo Cook, Pablo Mayen
Sponsor: GE Oil & Gas            Advisor: Dr. Siddique

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Prototype Project Outstanding Group 1st Place
“Development of an iHub Robotic Tourguide”
Student Team: Nathan Smith, Eric Gaskell, Nour Belbekri, Hunter Bonham, John Collette, Alejandro Dasi
Sponsor: Innovation Hub           Advisor: Dr. Stalford

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Prototype Project Outstanding Group 2nd Place
“Method/means to Track Web on Centerline in Real Time”
Student Team: Drew Walther, Patrick Ahearn, Ann Marie Berryhill, Caleb Monigold, Joshua Blaine
Sponsor: Kimberly-Clark           Advisor: Dr. Dalton

ame-capstone-2017

Studies Project Outstanding Group 1st Place
“Surfboard”
Student Team: Beau Bellamy, Brandon Groh, Andres Perilla, Cameron Fielden
Sponsor: Dr. Stalford                     Advisor: Dr. Stalford

ame-capstone-2017

Studies Project Outstanding Group 2nd Place
“Bearing Machine Upgrade to Include Sensing Elements and Capability to Evaluate Thrust Bearing”
Student Team: James Roecker, Jacob Bertelli, Blaise Newman, Russell Vanecek
Sponsor: Baker Hughes                 Advisor: Dr. Stalford

ame-capstone-2017

Studies Project Outstanding Group Tied for 3rd Place
“RCD Re-Engineering RCD-IS and Test Design”
Student Team: Thomas O’Connor, Carter David, Jacquelyn Ogle, Kenni Bui
Sponsor: Weir               Advisor: Dr. Mistree

ame-capstone-2017

Studies Project Outstanding Group Tied for 3rd Place
“Conceptual Design Alternatives to the Current Compression Tube Design”
Student Team: Robert Dooman, Cole Lindley, William Nelson, Dominic Scott
Sponsor: GE Oil & Gas               Advisor: Dr. Hekiri

ame-capstone-2017

Testing Project Outstanding Group 1st Place
“Rotary Electro-Mechanical System”
Student Team: Hassan AlDarwish, Saeed Alzaki, Kevin Song, Calhoun John, Mansur Brandon
Sponsor: Schlumberger                 Advisor: Dr. Siddique

ame-capstone-2017

Testing Project Outstanding Group 2nd Place
“Increasing the Performance of Li-Ion Batteries by Employing Transition Metal-Oxide Films Prepared in Flames”
Student Team: Miles Burnett, Kirsten Perry, Octavio Mejia, Edvin Coyoy Lopez, Bohan Yu
Sponsor: Dr. Merchan-Merchan                 Advisor: Dr. Siddique

ame-capstone-2017

Vehicle Project Outstanding Group 1st Place
“Sooner Off Road”
Student Team: Ryan Hill, Kelsey Chofey, Bryson Simer, Jon Moore
Sponsor: OU                Advisor: Dr. Dalton

ame-capstone-2017

Vehicle Project Outstanding Group 2nd Place
“Sooner Racing Team”
Student Team: Zack Maxwell, Wes Reynolds, Sam Faux, Connor Millican, Ryan Miller
Sponsor: OU                Advisor: Dr. Siddique

DBF-competition-2017-ame-2

The Design Build Fly Crimson Skies team finished sixth out of 95 teams at the AIAA DBF competition in Tuscon, Arizona this year! The team finished all missions and received many compliments from judges and competitors on the novelty of their inflatable fabric wing.

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SpaceX, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, Textron, and Northrop Grumman were just a few of the companies on-site recruiting.   A SpaceX recovery systems employee was particularly interested in our inflatable wing and came by our work tent several times to chat with students.

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According to the DBF rules, Student teams had to design, fabricate, and demonstrate the flight capabilities of an unmanned, electric powered, radio controlled aircraft that could best meet the specified mission profile. The goal was to have a balanced design possessing well-demonstrated flight handling qualities and practical and affordable manufacturing requirements while providing a high vehicle performance.

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The objective for this year’s competition was to design a tube-launched UAV. The UAV must fit complete inside the launch tube, which also acts as the UAV handling and storage container. The launch tube must protect the UAV from damage during normal handling and storage. Upon removal of the UAV from the launch tube, all folded or stowed surfaces or features must move into the flight condition. Teams had to design a UAV and launch tube that minimizes system weight while maximizing speed, range, endurance and payload capacity.

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DBF Crimson Skies tested multiple designs before creating the successful “Batwing II,” which is the given name of their winning aircraft.

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aiaa-asme-ame-symposium-2017AME faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students attended the 37th Oklahoma AIAA/ASME Symposium at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 15, 2017. AME students contributed 15 technical presentations to the symposium. AME faculty, Drs. Chung-Hao Lee and Yingtao Liu, served as session chairs and led technical discussions in their session.

The Oklahoma AIAA/ASME Symposium is an annual student conference in the State of Oklahoma. Students majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineering from the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and University of Tulsa present their research at this conference. This is a prestigious opportunity for OU AME students to publicize their research and prepare for their academic / industrial careers.

 

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The inaugural OU Giving Day was February 28, 2017. It was a 24-hour online fundraiser for scholarships to give everyone the opportunity to make an impact in the lives of OU students.

The funds raised on OU Giving Day go directly to the Gallogly College of Engineering unrestricted scholarship fund. Scholarships through this fund will be awarded to undergraduates and graduate students in any of the College’s seven schools of any major and awarded in 2017.

Gallogly College swept 2 of the 3 University competitions and will receive an additional $2,000, bringing the OU Giving Day total to $30,386! This means that 30 students will receive a scholarship this fall, and YOU made that possible.

1st Place: Most New Donors, with 138. 62% of those that gave to GCoE made their first gift!

1st Place: Most Dollars Raised

Each department within Gallogly College competed to raise the most money and the results are in!

1st Place – Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 

2nd Place – Computer Science 

3rd Place – Industrial and Systems Engineering

Our very own Director Altan donated and even made a video to encourage others to participate.

Thank you to everyone who donated!

Six AME graduate students participated in the 2017 Student Research and Creativity Day. There was a total of 65 entries in the event.  Join us in thanking the participants:

Jackson Autrey                             Siddique and Mistree

Shangyuan Jiang                          Gan

Anand Balu Nellippallil              Allen and Mistree

Mortaza Saeidijavash                  Garg

Xiwen Shang                                 Allen and Mistree

Ru Wang                                        Allen and Mistree

 

Congratulations to Mortaza Saeidijavash for placing second in the engineering category.

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al-roker-ou-sooner-race-team-ame

Al Roker from the Today Show delivered a 34-hour long weather forecast for the Rokerthon 2 event. He visited all 50 states and stopped in Norman, OK to break two Guinness World Records, the largest human image of a cloud and a lightning bolt. Leading up to the event, he visited the Sooner Racing Team!

For the full story, click here.

ABOUT LEAN CELL ADVISING

Students must sign up for a 30-minute block using iAdvise to prevent long wait times. All advising sessions will be held in Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200. When students arrive, they should have completed all tasks under “Know Before You Go” below.

All students must attend Lean Cell Advising or students may not be able to enroll in courses until Fall 2017. 

LEAN CELL ADVISING + iADVISE

AME Students must sign up for advising with iAdvise. AME has designated a 30-minute block sign up for students. The appointment should only take approximately 10-15 minutes as long as student comes prepared. Please note, all students MUST SIGN-UP FOR A TIME WITH iADVISE IN ORDER TO BE ADVISED.

Follow the simple steps below to sign-up with iAdvise:

  1. Log in to http://iadvise.ou.edu using your 4×4 and password.
  2. Select the Department Level Advisement (AE or ME at the School of Aerosapce and Mechanical Engineering), then select Make Group Appointment. 
  3. Reserve an advising time slot (ex. 12:30 time is for 12:30-1:00pm time slot). You can only reserve one slot.
  4. Arrive at the beginning of your time slot. You will be seen sometime within that 30-minute time frame. The advising session should only take approximately 10-15 minutes if student comes prepared.
  5. If you do not reserve a time slot before attending Lean Cell Advising, you may not be seen if the time slot is full.
iAdvise
download icon iAdvise Step-by-Step
Download the iAdvise step-by-step PDF here:

ADVISING DATES

All AME Lean Cell Advising sessions will take place in the Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200.

  • Returning Seniors & National Merit Scholars: Tuesday, February 28th from 12:00-3:00pm
  • Sophomores & Pre-Med: Wednesday, March 1st from 1:00-4:00pm
  • Juniors: Thursday, March 2nd from 12:00-3:00PM
  • Freshmen: Monday, March 27th from 1:00-4:30PM

Unsure of your academic classification? Go to oZone > click the academic tab > click academic profile > select the current semester

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

  • Prepare a course plan in Degree Navigator by logging on to ozone.ou.edu (The course plans on oZone do not check for pre-requisites nor will it verify courses offered during a specific semester)
  • Bring prepared course plan, degree check sheet and degree flowchart with the classes you have taken checked off, current courses circled and courses you plan to take in Fall 2017 highlighted
  • If you are not prepared upon arrival, your time will not be guranteed
  • A staff member from the Williams Student Services Center will be in attendance to remove your advising hold and answer any enrollment/graduation questions
  • A Pre-Med representative will be in attendance on Wednesday, March 1st

OTHER INFORMATION

Freshmen are required to be advised by their University College, Athletics, or Honors/Scholars Advisor in order to be able to enroll.

Do you have questions or concerns about advising, classes, your current major or school in general?

Please know that aside from Lean Cell Advising, you are encouraged to meet with your College Advisor in the Williams Student Services Center (WSSC) any time you have questions, or concerns you wish to discuss in a one-on-one meeting. Lean Cell Advising is an advising process intended to provide a stream-lined process for meeting with your major faculty advisor while also addressing the multiple steps in theadvising/enrollment system without having to visit multiple offices and staff. HOWEVER, you can, and are encouraged to, meet with your WSSC advisor if you require or would benefit from more in-depth guidance and academic counseling. It’s easy to do! Log into: iadvise.ou.edu to access available appointment times for your specific advisor. Don’t see any openings? Click here to contact your WSSC advisor or call WSSC directly at (405) 325-4096.

Do you have questions about career fairs, graduate school, internships and co-ops? 

WSSC advisors are here to assist you with Career Counseling. We encourage you to take advantage of this guidance as you prepare for your future as an engineer!

QUESTIONS?

For more information or accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Kate O’Brien at kobrien@ou.edu.

Dr. David P. Miller spoke at the 2017 Oklahoma City Joint Engineering Societies Banquet on February 23, 2017 at the Gaylord Student Center at Oklahoma Christian University in Edmond, Oklahoma.

The program featured Dr. David P. Miller, who since 1999 has been the Wilkonson Chair and Professor of Intelligent Systems based in the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) at the University of Oklahoma. Miller has a Bachelors in Astronomy from Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science/AI from Yale. His primary research areas are in mobility, the tradeoff between algorithm and mechanism, assistive technology and STEM education. Miller worked at NASA’s Ames Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for his work at JPL leading to the Mars Pathfinder Rover Mission. He is a founder of KISS Institute for Practical Robotics and their Botball Program. Miller is the faculty advisor for the OU Boomer Rocket Team and the Sooner Rover Team (SoRo). In the Fall of 2015, OU was competitively selected as one of eight universities to compete in the NASA RASC-AL Robo-Ops competition. The competition involves finding and retrieving designated samples from Mars and Lunar-like environments (at NASA JSC) while tele-operating the rover from a remote location (in our case, Norman OK). OU students designed and built the rover over the next 8 months and competed in May of 2016. This talk will discuss the team, their design and performance at the competition (Spoiler: we won).

According to Miller, after his “Rovers and OU Student Engineering Teams” presentation, several high school students that plan to attend the University of Oklahoma expressed interest in joining rover, rocket or space related student teams and were currently involved in robotics teams at their high school.

The Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers (OSPE) Central/Southwest Chapter sponsored the banquet. This event was held in conjunction with Engineer’s Week that many Oklahoma engineering societies participate in. A number of students also attended the banquet, including participants in Engineer for a Day, Future Ciies, and MATHCOUNTS programs.

michael-zavlanos-dream-course

Dr. Michael Zavlanos visited AME on February 2, 2017 as part of Dr. Andrea L’Afflitto’s Dream Course, Modern Control Theory and Applications.

Abstract: Current robotic systems have the potential to accomplish a previously intractable scope of tasks. Their ever growing capabilities will soon allow them to operate autonomously outside the lab, in remote, unpredictable, and uncertain environments, where the presence of humans is dangerous or even impossible. For this to become possible, a fundamental challenge is to develop new methods that will enable teams of robotic sensors to collaboratively explore unknown environments and extract concise actionable information. In this talk,we present a novel approach to dynamically synthesize optimal controllers for a robotic sensor network tasked with estimating a collection of hidden states. The key idea is to divide the hidden states into clusters and then use dynamic programming to determine optimal trajectories around each hidden state as well as how far along the local optimal trajectories the robot should travel before transitioning to estimating the next hidden state within the cluster. Then, a distributed assignment algorithm is used to dynamically allocate controllers to the robot team from the set of optimal control policies at every cluster. Compared to relevant distributed state estimation methods, our approach scales very well to large teams of mobile robots and hidden vectors. We also present a distributed state estimation method that allows mobile sensor networks to estimate a set of hidden states up to a user-specified accuracy. This is done by formulating a LMI constrained optimization problem to minimize the worst case state uncertainty, which we solve in a distributed way using a new random approximate projections method that is robust to the state disagreement errors that exist among the robots as an Information Consensus Filter (ICF) fuses the collected measurements. To our knowledge, even though the distributed active sensing literature is well-developed, the ability to control worst-case estimation uncertainty in a distributed fashion is new. We present numerical simulations and experimental results that show the efficiency of the reposed methods.

Bio: Michael M. Zavlanos received the Diploma in mechanical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens, Greece, in 2002, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. From 2008 to 2009 he was a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He then joined the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, as an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, where he remained until 2012. Currently, he is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, Durham, NC. He also holds a secondary appointment in the department of electrical and computer engineering. His research interests include a wide range of topics in the emerging discipline of networked systems, with applications in robotic, sensor, and communication networks. He is particularly interested in hybrid solution techniques, on the interface of control theory, distributed optimization, estimation, and networking. Dr. Zavlanos is a recipient of the 2014 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program (YIP) Award, the 2011 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, as well as Best Student Paper Awards at GlobalSIP 2014 and CDC 2006.

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