Brooke Owens Fellowship Recipient Encourages Others to Apply

This summer, aerospace engineering student Kaley Hassell participated in the Brooke Owens Fellowship Program. Now, she is encouraging other students to apply.

Hassell decided to apply for the Brooke Owens Fellowship program when she saw that it offered opportunities to work with amazing aerospace companies. She said, “the program is absolutely amazing for undergraduate women in aerospace.” Applications for the fellowship are open, and they close on November 12th.

As a selected fellow, Kaley Hassel worked with the engineering department at Sierra Nevada Corporation on the Dream Chaser spacecraft. She also got the opportunity to work with astronauts and CEOs.

Part of the Brooke Owens Fellowship Summit was the grand challenge presentation held in Washington D.C. “All of us were divided into groups and solved a grand challenge-or humanity’s next biggest feat,” Hassell said. “We got to present and network with a lot of cool people! We were tasked with solving how we could create a collaborative lunar economy. It was a lot of fun.”

Part of the Fellowship is being assigned a professional mentor. “Mine was Mr. Tory Bruno, CEO of the United Launch Alliance,” Hassell said. “It was really awesome getting to know and learn from him. He even invited me to observe mission control on the recent AEHF5 launch on August 8th!”

Kaley Hassell’s Experiences

NASA Administrator Mr. Jim Bridenstine keynote spoke to the Brookies at one of the fellowship dinners. “It was really cool,” Hassell said. “I learned a lot about how policy goes into the aerospace world and even got to ask him a question face to face!”

Hassell said the Brookies are definitely a family. She got to make some great connections with women from around the world who are passionate about making a change in the world of aerospace.

They also got to have a fireside chat with NASA Chief of Staff Janet Karika.

They also got to meet Oklahoma Representative Kendra Horn, and have a fireside chat with her about different space issues as well as learn from her successes and experience.

Kaley Hassell and her friend Ivy (another Brookie) with the Dream Chaser spacecraft. “I worked in the Systems Engineering department, solving problems and integrating between different systems,” Hassell said.

Pictured is the Brookie Class of 2019 at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum. The Discovery space shuttle is in the background. “It was really cool to see it in person since I was basically working on a mini version of the Shuttle at SNC this summer!” Hassell said.

Student Team Updates

SOONER OFF-ROAD TEAM

On May 16, the Sooner Off-Road team traveled to California for the Baja SAE competition. In the competition, engineering students were tasked with designing and building a single-seat, all-terrain sporting vehicle.

The Sooner Off-Road team was able to pass technical inspection and brake check on the first day of the competition. Additionally, they received 13th place in the suspension & traction event, 12th place in the sales presentation, 100/150 points in the design presentation, and 30th in the endurance race. The team finished 34th overall. The team and their advisors are very proud of the results!

On September 21, the team also attended the Midnight Mayhem Competition at the University of Lousiville. They took two vehicles to the competition, the 2019 competition vehicle, Isabella #12, and the 2018 competition vehicle, Valerie #41. They competed against 100 other teams in the competition and finished with successful results.

SOONER RACING TEAM

The Sooner Racing Team had a successful competition at Formula SAE Lincoln, an engineering design competition for undergraduate and graduate students. The team traveled to Lincoln, Nebraska from June 19-22 and exceeded their goals for the competition.

The Sooner Racing Team received 14th in the cost event, 14th in fuel efficiency, 22nd in endurance, 26th in acceleration, 29th in design, and a 10th place award for the quality of their engineering drawings. They finished the competition 33rd overall out of the 80 teams. Additionally, the team got through technical inspections in the first two days with only minor adjustments needed, completed all of the static and dynamic events, and finished the endurance race. Overall, the team is very happy with the results and the way the car came out this year!

BOOMER ROCKET TEAM

Boomer Rocket Team received 3rd place at the Argonia cup competition. The event took place in Argonia, Kansas from March 30-31, 2019.

The competition objective was to launch a rocket-powered vehicle in excess of 8,000’ AGL. The rocket had to contain a golf ball payload, and the team had to recover the payload safely at a predetermined location on the rocket range.

FUNDRAISING EFFORTS

OU Thousands Strong is OU’s official crowdfunding platform. It serves as an online tool to help students, faculty and staff display select projects and raise funds to turn their ambitious ideas into reality. Two AME student teams are currently running campaigns, Sooner Off-Road and OU Boomer Rocket Team. Design, Build, Fly will be starting a campaign in the near future.

Sooner Off-Road Thousands Strong Campaign (Click to Donate)

OU Boomer Rocket Team Thousands Strong Campaign (Click to Donate)

Alumni Opportunity: Capstone Projects

AME alumni:

We need your help! The Mechanical Engineering Capstone program has grown in size tremendously in recent years, and we are in need of additional industry-sponsored projects to support our large student cohort for Spring 2020.

casptone-projects-needed-ame

 
For many years, our capstone program has collaborated with industry sponsors, like you, to provide “real-life” industry projects for our seniors to complete during their final semester in school. These projects allow our students to successfully demonstrate a variety of skills that future employers prize: analysis, design, teamwork and communication skills to name a few. Ideally, the project will feature some elements of a design process and be suited for a team of 3-5 members for a period of 15 weeks. We are also interested in interdisciplinary projects that may involve industrial or electrical engineers as well.
 
If you believe your company may be able to assist us, please contact Dr. Chris Dalton at cdalton@ou.edu. The deadline for project submission requests is November 1, 2019

Dr. Hays and Students Place First in the American Radio Relay League RTTY Rookie Roundup

Aerospace engineering sophomore Jarrod Manning, data science masters student Jorge Garcia, and Dr. Hays placed first in ARRL’s (American Radio Relay League) RTTY rookie roundup competition on August 18th.

The students used the national weather center’s tri-band yagi antenna to make 50 contacts using RTTY (Baudot FSK digital mode). Contacts came from widely varying distances as close as Norman, and as far abroad as Belgium. The competition encourages new amateur radio operators that have earned their license within the previous three years to engage in antenna, propagation, and digital mode studies. ARRL is the primary amateur radio organization in the United States and sponsors many similar competitions throughout the year.

Graduate Student Alex Bryant is Hired by Lockheed Martin Skunkworks


Alex Bryant Skunkworks Lockheed Martin

Alex Bryant, a graduate student working towards his masters in Aerospace engineering, has been hired for a stability and control position at Lockheed’s Fort Worth, Texas Skunkworks group. Bryant will begin working for Lockheed Martin after graduation.

He will work as a stability and control engineer for approximately one year, at which point the company intends to move him into conceptual design for advanced programs.

 

“I’m looking forward to working on the cutting edge of the aerospace defense industry,” Bryant said. “Lockheed Martin ‘Skunkworks’ has been on the cutting edge of the aerospace world for over half a century now, and getting the opportunity to join their team in a role that suits my skill set is an incredible opportunity.”

 

Bryant said that he’s wanted to work for Lockheed since he was 12 years old. ‘Skunkworks’ was attached to every design he was interested in, and he says they’re the best at what they do.

 

“OU AME has equipped me with the knowledge and skills that Lockheed was looking for in my role,” Bryant said. The Wind Tunnel Laboratory and Flight Mechanics courses will be heavily drawn on at his job.

 

“Our aerospace pre-capstone and capstone courses were big reasons why I was specifically selected for this, as knowledge of aircraft sizing, trade studies, multi-variable optimization, and aircraft requirement-to-design processes was essential,” Bryant said.

This is one of the most competitive positions to be hired into, and Alex was selected over 55 other candidates from other big-name Universities including GT, A&M, and others. Congratulations Alex!

AME Represented at AERO Oklahoma Day 2019

Professor Thomas Hays and AME Communications Coordinator Rebeka Morales represented AME at the AERO Oklahoma Aviation & Aerospace Awareness Day on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. The event was held at the Oklahoma City Capitol and open to the public.

“AERO Oklahoma” Day places aviation and aerospace organizations front and center. As Oklahoma’s second largest industry, the purpose of this awareness day was to recognize this vital economic engine and to provide a greater understanding of the impact aviation has on the lives of Oklahoma’s citizens. It is a unique opportunity for Oklahoma aerospace companies, private and commercial pilots, airport managers, municipal officials, drone pilots, educators, flying clubs, and many other users of the Oklahoma Airport System to meet one-on-one with state legislators and other elected officials regarding aviation. During this aviation and aerospace awareness day, free exhibit booths from over 80 companies were represented.

For more information on the event, visit the Facebook event page.

Aerospace Engineering Student Featured in OU Crimson Spotlight

Sarah Ciccaglione, an aerospace engineering student, was featured in the “Crimson Spotlight” segment of the Inside OU newsletter on March 13, 2019. In the video, she speaks about her involvement at OU and how the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering has made her feel at home.

Ciccaglione is a member of the Sooner Racing Team. She enjoys the mechanical systems behind the cars and competing with her team. Ciccaglione is interested in the technical side of aerospace engineering and she enjoys the math and science involved in her major. Furthering her career in the engineering field, she also got the opportunity to intern with Tesla in Palo Alto, California.

Ciccaglione is very involved on campus. She is a member of the rowing team and double majors in aerospace and vocal performance. Ciccaglione loves all of the opportunities that OU provides for its students and the support system she has gained.

Click here to watch the Crimson Spotlight video featuring Sarah Ciccaglione.

Chinedum Ezeakacha presents over Performance Verification and Material Testing of Liner Hanger Sealing Components for Oil and Gas Application

On Friday, February 8, AME hosted a seminar from Chinedum Peter Ezeakacha, a post-doctoral research associate at the Well Construction Technology center at OU. In his research, he speaks about performance verification and material testing of liner hanger sealing components for oil and gas application.

Abstract: Drilling operations, particularly in an offshore environment, require special tools and equipment. Liners and liner hangers are commonly used in offshore drilling applications instead of full string casings. When a well section is drilled, liner hanger and cement are used to engage and seal off the liner, connecting it to the previous casing. Typically, the liner hanger seal assembly is placed up-stream to the cement column. This arrangement prevents the independent evaluation of the integrity of both mechanical barriers (cement and liner hanger seal) after installation. The report from an oil and gas regulatory agency highlighted that the cause of a recent underground kick with this type of arrangement can be linked to the failure of he mechanical barriers under the operating conditions. While some of the design criteria for liner hangers are obtained from API 17D (Design and Operation of Subsea Production Systems – Subsea Wellhead and Tree Equipment), there is currently no standard that specifically addresses liner hangers or seals, nor how to test them. In this seminar, the performance of cement sheath and elastomeric seals used in liner hangers will be presented. Different downhole conditions in which these mechanical barriers can fail were simulated. The scope of the project necessitated a cross-disciplinary investigation involving the knowledges from mechanical engineering, petroleum engineering, and civil/material engineering. Thus, the barrier testing protocols were developed in consonance with the key questions raised by the agency, existing practice in 30 CFR 250.425, as well as ASTM and ASME standards. The summary of the findings in this study points towards testing the mechanical barriers for the anticipated downhole conditions before deploying them, particularly in gas-migration prone zones. In this study, the term “barrier(s)” defines the use of cement sheath and the liner hanger sealing assembly to prevent uncontrolled influx and migration of formation fluid to a shallow formation or surface facilities.

Biography: Chinedum Peter Ezeakacha is a post-doctoral research associate at the Well Construction Technology Center, The University of Oklahoma. He holds a B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nigeria (2009). After his bachelors’ program, he worked with ExxonMobil in Nigeria as a petroleum engineer from 2010 to 2011. Before enrolling in graduate school (spring 2013), he provided field support for installation, operation, and maintenance of compressed natural gas and pressure reduction stations for NG Equipment and Systems Ltd Nigeria (2011 to 2012). From 2013 to 2015, he instructed three lab sessions (well control, drilling fluids, and petrophysics), and one class (drilling engineering) at The University of Louisiana at Lafayette. In December 2014, he earned a M.Sc. in Engineering from UL Lafayette. Chinedum received his Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from the Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at The University of Oklahoma in December 2018. During his 6-year graduate program in both colleges, Chinedum had 4 scholarships and 3 travel grants/support. He participated in 12 regional, national, and international graduate student research paper contests out of which won the 1st place award three times, 2nd place award once, and 3rd place award twice. He also participated in the SPE International Petrobowl Competition in 2014 as a player (placed 5th in Amsterdam The Netherlands), in 2015 as a coach (placed 4th in Houston Texas), and in 2016 as a coach (placed 2nd in Dubai UAE). Chinedum has presented more than 12 papers at several regional, national, and international conferences, meetings, and symposiums. He has published 9 papers in 5 journals (JERT, JPSE, JNGSE, Polymer, and JPEPT) and 14 conference papers (ASME OMAE, SPE, IADC/SPE, AADE, and ARMA). His research interests are in well integrity, downhole tool/material performance, design of experiments and data analysis, and wellbore stability.

 

 

 

AME Staff featured on TECAID

AME was one of the selected schools to be featured on the TECAID website with WEPAN. This website focuses on transforming engineering culture to advance inclusion and diversity. TECAID is an active program in which engineers can learn about the environment they are in while learning about their skills and knowledge. They focus on how to create the best personalized experience for their engineers.

https://www.wepan.org/mpage/TECAID

We are now highlighted in multiple Webinars (2 and 3) along with a photo of the OU team. An interview was done with our director, Dr. Zahed Saddique. The interview can be found at this link: https://www.wepan.org/mpage/TECAID_MechEngDepts

We would like to thank Phil Dineen who served as TECAID’s web designer and ASME who provided funds to make these final updates possible.

Giving Day 2018

For 24 hours on Tuesday, the University of Oklahoma hosted Giving Day, a campus wide fundraiser to help our students and programs! Overall the University raised $477,764 through 2,123 gifts.

The engineering department raised $96,100 with 459 gifts and AME’s own ambassador, Rebeka Morales yielded the most gifts university-wide. AME had an encouraging message from Dr. Siddique to get the donations started and a donation center in the Hitachi Conference room where students could donate between classes.

AME would like to thank everyone who donated to support our amazing student teams! They have big goals and with your support that are even closer to reaching them.

Thank you to our challenge from Michelle Coppedge who matched $1000 after we raised $1000 and another $1000 after we obtained 30 total gifts.