Dr. Kazempoor Presents Seminar over Driving Sustainable Performance in the Oil and Gas Industry

Pejman Kazempoor, Ph.D., gave a seminar on Thursday, February 21, about driving sustainable performance in the oil and gas industry. Dr. Kazempoor is a senior engineer and project manager at Baker-Hughes, a GE company.

Abstract: The world energy consumption is projected to grow by 28% between 2015 and 2040, with fossil fuels accounting for more than three-quarters of the world energy mix during this period. As oil & gas (O&G) will remain essential to global economic development for decades to come, global concerns about climate change and pollution are leading to a focus on the amount of energy it takes to produce hydrocarbon fuels. Energy efficiency and emissions reduction, which are intrinsically connected, have been identified as important challenges to the O&G industry and positive drivers that can improve productivity, lower operating costs, and reduce environmental impacts. This presentation is designed to provide a deeper understanding of sustainable energy in the O&G sector and to offer a comprehensive explanation of the opportunities available to achieve it. The main emphasis will be on natural gas and its associated production, processing, and transportation technologies. Specifically, emissions reduction and mitigation technologies, waste energy, and fuel utilization techniques, and natural gas process optimization will be discussed in more detail. The author’s previous and current fundamental research projects and industrial work experience in the same field will be presented. The seminar will conclude by highlighting future research directions and potential projects.

Biography: Pejman Kazempoor is a senior engineer and project manager at Baker-Hughes, a GE company (formerly known as GE Global Research -Oil and Gas Technology Center). He is responsible for driving innovative research and development activities and taking new technologies from the conceptual stage to full commercialization. His current and previous projects at BHGE focus on four specific areas: emission reduction techniques and technologies, sustainability, and energy efficiency, natural gas monetization, and renewable energy application in the Oil & Gas Industry.  Pejman graduated with his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in Dec. 2009 from Tarbiat Modares University (TMU), Tehran in partnership with EMPA, Switzerland (ETH-Zurich Domain), where he investigated building integrated co- and poly-generation systems in the framework of the multi-national Polysmart project. He received the Presidential Award, two best conference paper awards, and the TMU outstanding Ph.D. student award for his Ph.D. work and accomplishments. Pejman is the recipient of BHGE’s 2018 Technology Excellence Award, a referee for 15 high-prestige journals in the field of thermal and fluid sciences, and Associate Editor for Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering-Elsevier. He also published more than 50 papers in various national and international peer-reviewed journals and conferences, including a book chapter. Pejman innovative experience is also highlighted by three issued patents, as well as four pending patents.

 

 

Dr. L’Afflitto is Guest on “Just Sow” Podcast

Wednesday, February 20, Dr. L’Afflitto was featured on an episode of OU’s “Just Sow” podcast where he spoke about drone technology.

In the podcast, Dr. L’Afflitto spoke about the future of drones at home and in the office. According to Dr. L’Afflitto, drones could be especially beneficial to those who have mobility impairments. The drones he is designing right now will help people with disorders to more easily manipulate and operate the world around them. He is currently trying to overcome the many technological challenges that go along with this project.

Dr. L’Afflitto said he believes that drones will be one of the many tools available for us in the future. He sees us using drones for picking up groceries, lifting heavy objects in warehouses, and supporting our ground troops. Teaching the drones to do these activities are just some of the things he’s working on in the lab. He also spoke about how he incorporates biology into his drone technology. However, he said that mathematical problems are at the heart of this research. Dr. L’Afflitto said it’s hard for him to imagine someone who would not be fascinated by drone technology.

Click here to visit Dr. L’Afflitto’s website.

Dr. Song Receives 2018 ASHRAE Technical Paper Award

Dr. Song and her student Shima Shahahmadi will be presented with the 2018 ASHRAE Technical Paper Award on June 22 at the Society’s Annual Conference in Kansas City, Missouri. This award recognizes the best papers presented each year at Society meetings.

The paper is titled “Value Flowmeter Enhancement through Computing Valve Dynamic Behaviors” and AME is very proud of Dr. Song for winning this award two years in a row!

 

Dr. Garg Receives NSF CAREER Grant

On February 7, Assistant Professor Jivtesh Garg was awarded the CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation. He will be working on the investigation of strain and superior functionalization schemes for large enhancement of thermal conductivity in polymer-graphene nanocomposites and binary semiconductors. The NSF grant award for this project is a total of $500,000.

The NSF CAREER project targets large enhancement in thermal conductivity of polymer-graphene nanocomposites and group III-V semiconductors. Such high thermal conductivity polymers and semiconductors will significantly improve thermal management in electronics, automotive, aerospace, power generation, and energy harvesting applications. The approach involves simultaneously aligning the most thermally conductive paths in polymer and graphene particles and also covalently bonding the two to enhance thermal conductance at the polymer-graphene interface. Promising results have been achieved by our group in preliminary work. The thermal conductivity of semiconductor materials will be enhanced through phonon lifetime engineering.

The project also aims to enhance the participation of high school students through a summer camp program. To stimulate fascination with thermal transport, high school students will measure thermal response through colorful visualization of temperatures maps using infra-red imaging. Simultaneously the program will aim to enhance diversity by engaging American Indian students from various colleges in Oklahoma. The participants will develop an understanding of both atomistic simulations and perform experimental characterization of thermal transport.

Within polymers, thermal conductivity is highest along the polymer chain axis. Similarly, graphene nanoplatelets have dramatically higher in-plane compared to through-plane thermal conductivity. Simultaneous alignment of polymer chains and planar direction of nanoplatelets is achieved in this project through strain. Alignment is characterized through microscopy and imaging. As a second aspect, non-equilibrium Green’s function computations are used to achieve understanding of covalent bonding schemes enabling superior interfacial thermal conductance between polymer and graphene. Functionalized polymer composites will be prepared through such efficient schemes and thermally characterized in this work both experimentally and via atomistic simulations.

Finally, energy gap in the vibrational spectra of certain group III-V semiconductors has been shown to dramatically suppress scattering of low energy phonons, leading to large enhancement in phonon lifetimes, thus increasing overall material thermal conductivity. We have demonstrated this effect in ideal short-period superlattices and more recently in Gallium Nitride. This project will computationally explore strain engineering to further increase energy gap, resulting in higher phonon lifetimes. Strain effects will be quantified accurately through a first-principles approach based on deriving interatomic force interactions from density-functional theory and using them in an exact solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation.

Dr. Garg says that he is very thankful to National Science Foundation (NSF) for awarding him this grant. It will allow him to significantly enhance research, in his group, related to thermal transport at the atomistic scale for design of advanced materials for thermal management and energy conversion applications.

Congratulations Dr. Garg!

Dr. Song Receives Multiple Awards for Current Research

Dr. Li Song, an associate professor at AME, received three awards for her current research projects. Two awards are from the Department of Energy, and the third award is from Battelle – Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Song is the lead PI for the development and validation of a home comfort system for total performance deficiency/fault detection and optimal control project, which received a DOE fund of $993,149. The research team will develop and validate a smart thermostat-integrated low-cost home energy management system, including a data connection framework; a computationally efficient, self-learning home thermal model; automatic fault detection and analysis algorithms; and home energy management information and controls based on in-situ measured efficiencies of heating and cooling equipment, the air distribution system, and the building envelope.

The second DOE fund is $551,566 for the performance demonstration of an occupancy sensor-enabled integrated solution for commercial buildings project. The research team will validate the performance and savings of three HVAC control (fan, cooling coil valve, outside air) algorithms integrated with occupancy sensing data to optimize ventilation delivery.

A $50,000 award was given to Song from Battelle – Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for her Transactive-Control Based Connected Home Solution for Existing Residential Units and Communities project.

This is a summary of Song’s research proposal sent to Battelle: To obtain the overall project aims, the development of machine learning techniques to calibrate the initial physical model that estimates and predicts energy use of a house and its response to control signals is extremely important. An effective home thermal model, that can predict the indoor air temperature dynamics under different weather, HVAC output and internal gains from appliances and occupants, is essential for the development.

BEEL initiated the development of a self-learning home thermal model two years ago. The BEEL home model, currently limited for a house with an A/C and gas-furnace heater, can automatically identify the model parameters with minimum data needed and precisely predict the space temperature and home HVAC energy uses for a house. To enhance the connectivity and compatibility of the platform proposed by PNNL, BEEL is committed to expand the home thermal model for a heat pump system and test enhanced home model using two houses located in Oklahoma through the partnership with OG&E. The challenge of modeling the heat pump is that the heating output from a heat pump is no longer constant as is for a gas furnace heater. A correlation of the heating output of a heat pump and outdoor air temperature needs to be formulated and similarly, a correlation between cooling output of a heat pump and weather might be needed for cooling season as well.

Congratulations Dr. Song!

 

 

AME Student Kaley Hassell has been Selected as a Brooke Owens Fellow

On February 5, Kaley Hassell, an undergraduate aerospace engineering student, was selected to receive the 2019 Brooke Owens Fellowship.

Hassell decided to apply for the Brooke Owens Fellowship program when she saw that it offered opportunities to work with amazing aerospace companies. As a selected fellow, Kaley Hassel will be working with the engineering department at Sierra Nevada Corporation on the Dream Chaser spacecraft. She will get the opportunity to work with astronauts and CEO’s.

Hassell says that OU’s aerospace program cemented her love for engineering. She has gotten to practice her aerospace skills through rocketry research and her involvement on the Formula SAE Sooner Racing Team. She is the chief aerodynamics engineer on the team and helps to design and build Formula style racing cars for competition. Hassell is very excited to have been selected for this program and looks forward to practicing her skills even more.

The Brooke Owens Fellowship is a very competitive program that offers only 38 women per year paid internship opportunities at top engineering companies. The selection process is extremely competitive with hundreds of applicants from top universities and only a select number of winners.

Congratulations Kaley!

 

Sooner Racing Team’s Thousands Strong Campaign Officially Launched

For the past seven months, Sooner Racing Team has been designing and manufacturing their car for this year’s Formula SAE competition. The team has a goal to raise $7,500 to get them on the road. The money will go towards transportation costs and supplies. The competition will provide professional experience for the team members, as they learn hands-on skills and have the opportunity to network with businesses in the automotive field, as well as, with students from 550 other universities around the world.

The Sooner Racing Team is an OU student organization that designs, builds, tests, and races an open-wheel, formula-style race car. The team wants to take their 2019 car to the Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) competition in Lincoln, Nebraska, but they need your help getting there!

To learn more about the team and to contribute to their campaign, visit the Sooner Racing Team’s Thousands Strong page: https://thousandsstrong.ou.edu/project/13784

Sooner Rover Team’s Thousands Strong campaign results!

Sooner Rover Team’s Thousands Strong campaign has come to an end with amazing results. They raised $9,410 and are currently assembling their rover for competition. It will take place from May 30th to June 1st at the Mars Society’s Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) near Hanksville, Utah.

Thank you to all who supported the team by donating!

Thousands Strong campaign results are in!

Design Build Fly (DBF) and Boomer Rocket Team (BRT) successfully completed their Thousands Strong campaign! While it was a very close competition between the two teams, Boomer Rocket Team pulled ahead of Design Build Fly by a mere $185. Both teams did however surpass their goal of $4,000. Boomer Rocket Team raised a total of $7,300 and Design Build Fly raised $7,115. This money went towards supplies needed to build their rocket and plane. 

Thank you to everyone who supported out teams by donating!


 

Wind Powered Robots – AME Pre-Capstone Project

The Mechanical Engineering Pre-Capstone project revolves around a central semester-long, team-based project. This project is designed to provide students with the opportunity to act as junior engineers exploring solutions to a complex, multi-level, and competency-building problem. This experiential learning provides the basis on which competencies will be further developed for students entering their Capstone project.

This year’s task is to design, build and test a system capable of converting wind energy into some more useful form of energy and then store this energy in some compact, transportable module. The wind source will be represented by a household electric fan, and the energy modules must be used to propel a vehicle, carrying large payload around a track.

Students are actively at work this semester and eager to complete the task at hand!

Mechanical Engineer senior, Adam Kordsiemon, gives us an insight to his groups journey at tackling this year’s Pre-Capstone project.