hamidreza-shabgard-bioDr. Hamidreza Shabgard joined AME as an Assistant Professor in the Fall 2016 semester. He completed his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration in thermal-fluid sciences at the University of Connecticut in 2014. Dr. Shabgard holds an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering with a concentration of energy conversion from the Amirkabir University of Technology (Iran) and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Azad University of Mashhad (Iran).

After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Shabgard took a post-doctoral position at Drexel University, where he worked on advanced dry-cooling technology for power plants. Dr. Shabgard’s research interests include multiphase flow and heat transfer, particulate flow, CFD, thermal energy storage, and heat pipes. His work is focused on the development of efficient and sustainable energy systems through a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics involved in fluid flow and heat transfer, as well as, innovative thermofluidic design.

Dr. Shabgard has big plans for his time at the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, “Energy is critical in our daily lives and is closely tied to environment and natural resources. My work is related to energy and in particular the thermal-fluid systems involved in production, conversion, storage, transfer and management of energy. As a faculty member in AME, I will have the opportunity to work with students and carry out cutting edge research in one of the finest educational institutions.”

AME-GSC-poster-fairPlease join AME in thanking the following graduate students and their mentors for participating in the Engineering Graduate Student Community 2016 Poster Fair organized by the GCOE on November 11, 2016. Of the 24 entries, five were from AME:

 

  1. Arun Balakrishnan: Effect of Fuel Aromatic Content on NOx Emission from Petro/Biodiesel Flames.  Mentors:  Gollahalli and Parthasarathy
  2. Tom Boone.  Operational Losses in Space Launch.  Mentor:  Miller
  3. Flavio Ivan Moreno: Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Three Component Fuel Blends in a Porous Media Burner.  Mentor:  Parthasarathy
  4. Anand Balu Nellippallil: A Goal-Oriented, Sequential Design Method for the Horizontal Integration of a Multi-Stage Hot Rod Rolling System.  Mentors:  Allen (ISE) and Mistree
  5. Dana Saeed: Robust Stimulation Method in Eagle Ford Shale.  Mentors: Pournik (PGE), Siddique and Mistree

Congratulations to Anand Balu Nellippallil for receiving the top award!

 

boomer-rocket-team-fundraiserDuring the past several months, the Boomer Rocket Team (BRT) has been working to design a rocket for the Spaceport America Cup, an incredibly competitive international rocket competition. To help achieve this, the Boomer Rocket Team’s fundraising campaign is being featured on OU’s Thousands Strong website.

BRT is an engineering competition team which focuses on the design and construction of high-powered rockets. The team has 3 main goals: participating in rocket based engineering competitions, certifying members to fly individual rockets, and gaining experience in rocket design and manufacturing techniques. Each year, the team chooses one or more competitions to enter, challenging them to explore innovative changes to standard rocket designs.

The goal of the BRT fundraising campaign is to raise $3000 in just over thirty days, ending on December 16th,2016. To give a donation or learn more information about the campaign, please visit http://bit.ly/2fndPbj.

UPDATE: The Boomer Rocket Team has had an absolutely incredible first week! In 7 days, with 19 sponsors, we already reached our initial goal of $3,000. We want to send a huge thank you to all of our sponsors! Your contributions have made competing possible this year.

However, we still have 3 weeks to go and we have no intention of quitting now! The Boomer Rocket Team is stretching its goal to $5,000 to help front the cost of participation in other competitions, and allow us additional design space for our Spaceport America Cup Rocket.

We are very excited to see what the next 25 days bring us. Thanks to your incredible support, the team can push farther than we ever planned to. You can continue to help us by telling friends and family about our campaign, and sharing our link wherever you can.

Thanks again for your support!

AME-robert-kunkel-blog-2AME undergraduate student, Robert Kunkel, represented OU in Washington, DC at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center and at ANSER.  Mr. Kunkel entered the AME program as a National Merit Scholar and is in his 3rd year of Mechanical Engineering with 18 additional hours for a pre-med emphasis and in the Honors College.

“I wasn’t sure how demanding the internship would turn out to be, but my experiences at OU, both in the classroom and in the practice facility made me confident that I was prepared to handle anything that I encountered,” said Mr. Kunkel.

He applied for the internship at NASA at the OU Job Fair.  In the interview process, he was so highly regarded that they gave him 2 projects instead of one.  He worked with the NASA NIAC team (Nasa Innovative Advanced Concepts) at Goddard for a project analyzing all project proposal submissions from 2011-2015. The executives at NASA will use the data from his project for future planning and funding for their programs.

For Mr. Kunkel’s second project, he was loaned to ANSER, a high-level Washington think tank. He was the only NASA intern that did this. His project was to work with a well-respected and published researcher on radiation, Dr. Ron Turner, to research Mitigating radiation on long-term astronauts by sheltering in lunar lava tubes. He is also cited as a co-author on this paper that will be published and presented at a conference in 2017.

He achieved his security clearance for this work and socialized with some of the top scientists in the country as they came to Washington for the NIAC events.  He also has personally read all NIAC proposals submitted by them since 2011.  At the conclusion of the internship, NASA had a ‘Poster Day’ where all the interns display the results of their work over the summer.

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In the future, Mr. Kunkel wants to work in research and development or possibly explore the private sector. He will pursue a master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering and is interested in biomedical engineering as an emphasis.

chung-hao-lee-bioDr. Chung-Hao Lee was an ICES/AHA postdoctoral fellow in the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) at the University of  Texas at Austin. Since 2012, he worked with Professor Michael Sacks on heart valve biomechanics. Previously, he graduated with a B.S. and M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan in 2003 and 2005, respectively, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering (Major in Structural & Computational Mechanics) from UCLA in 2011, working with Professor J.S. Chen on his dissertation on Atomistic to Continuum Modeling of DNA Molecules.

Dr. Lee’s research interests revolve around image-based computational biomechanics, tissue mechanical and microstructural quantifications, structure- based constitutive models for biological tissues, and multiscale materials modeling, with a primary focus on improving patient-specific healthcare of cardiovascular diseases by integrating essential biomechanical processes across molecular, cellular, tissue and organ scales.

He is excited for the new research opportunities at OU, “I am looking forward to collaborating with the colleagues in the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and the Gallogly College of Engineering at OU. Collaborative research across disciplines will bring together engineers like me and surgeons and clinicians to facilitate health-related biomedical research.”

aiaa-airshow-1A group of AIAA students attended the Fort Worth Alliance Air Show in Texas on October 15-16.

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The following students attended the event:

  • Bhagyashree Waghule
  • Chris Hughes
  • Nour El Yakine
  • Sebastian Medina
  • Hunter Herzfeld
  • Erica King
  • Hunter Haynes
  • Taoran Cheng

 

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keith-walters-bio      Dr. Keith Walters obtained his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Clemson University. He joined Mississippi State University in 2003, was promoted to Professor in 2015, and served as Associate Director of the Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems and Science Coordinator for the Mississippi National Science Foundation (NSF) EPSCoR program.

While at MSU, he advised 18 graduate students, was inducted into the Bagley College of Engineering Academy of Distinguished Teachers, and was awarded an NSF CAREER award. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Fluids Engineering Division (FED) Executive Committee, past chair of FED, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of Fluids Engineering. He recently won the ASME 2016 Robert T. Knapp award for the outstanding original paper in fluids engineering arising from laboratory or analytical work.

Dr. Walters’ research interests cover a broad range of topics in fluid mechanics and heat transfer, with a focus on computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

In his new position as Professor at OU AME, he is looking forward to “Getting to know a whole new group of students, faculty, and staff, and having the opportunity to ‘restart’ my research program in the direction that best suits my interests. I can’t wait to see what we can build here.”

chevron-executives-visit-ou

On October 18th, 2016, Chevron Executives Ken Nelson, Bill Hunter and Brent Walton visited AME. Dr. Cengiz Altan and Dr. Zahed Siddique spoke with them about the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering’s mission, provided a talent overview and presented opportunities to engage with AME students.

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Following the meeting, the Chevron executives attended a lunch and check presentation ceremony. Four AME students received the Chevron-Texaco Scholarship for the Fall 2016 semester. The scholarship recipients, Patrick Ahearn, Joseph Esparza, Ciore Taylor, and Joshua Tims, were invited to the luncheon where the guests presented the donation check. Congratulations!

jerry-qi-guest-lecture

AME hosted a guest lecture given by Dr. H. Jerry Qui on Monday, October 24, 2016. Dr. Qi presented his research regarding the design of active composites for 4D printing applications.

Recent advances in multimaterial 3D printing allow the precise placement of multiple materials at micrometer resolution with essentially no restrictions on the geometric complexity of the spatial arrangement. Complex 3D solids thus can be created with highly non-regular material distributions in an optimal fashion, enabling the fabrication of devices with unprecedented multifunctional performance. This also enables the emerging concept of 4D printing.

In his talk, Dr. Qi started with the concept of 4D printing, where he prints a composite in a relatively simple shape; after printing and some thermomechanical programming, the composite can change its shape as a function of time, the 4th dimension of the shape forming process. He further showed different designs to achieve the shape change, such as printed active composites and direct printing shape memory materials. To further enhance the functionality of the 4D printing, Dr. Qi explored the printing of conductive wires that can be used either for electric signal transfer or as heating elements. He investigated how different curing methods of the conductive ink can affect the electric properties as a function of strain.

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Based on the knowledge learned, Dr. Qi can fabricate a stretchable electronic device in a sequential process. He demonstrated a stretchable LED circuit, a heating element for shape memory polymers, and a sensor to detect shape change. This method provides the opportunity to print complex 3D stretchable electronics, which will be integrated with 4D printing for topology transferring devices. Finally, Dr. Qi discussed the challenge and future directions for 4D printing.

Bio: Dr. H. Jerry Qi is Professor and the Woodruff Faculty Fellow in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor degrees and graduate degree from Tsinghua University and a ScD degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After one year postdoc at MIT, he joined the University of Colorado Boulder as an assistant professor in 2004, and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2010. He joined Georgia Tech in 2014 and was promoted to a full professor in 2016.

Prof. Qi’s research is in the broad field of nonlinear mechanics of soft materials and focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of multi-field properties of soft active materials through experimentation and constitutive modeling then applying these understandings to application designs. He and his collaborators have been working on a range of soft active materials, including shape memory polymers, shape memory elastomeric composites, light activated polymers, covalent adaptable network polymers, for their interesting behaviors such as shape memory, light actuation, surface patterning, surface welding, healing, and reprocessing. Recently, he and his collaborators pioneered the 4D printing concept. Prof. Qi is a recipient of NSF CAREER award (2007). He is a member of Board of Directors for the Society of Engineering Science. In 2015, he was elected to an ASME Fellow.

 

coe-leadership-donna-shirley

It is no secret that each day at AME we salute the work of our students, staff and faculty members past and present. On October 13, 2016, we were fortunate enough to celebrate the work of our own alumna and former College of Engineering Assistant Dean & Instructor Donna Shirley, who was presented with the Annie Oakley Society Award at the society’s sixth annual luncheon and award ceremony. Notably in attendance were Governor Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, Gallogly College of Engineering Dean Tom Landers and other GCoE leadership, AME Professor David Miller and members of the Sooner Rover Team. The Annie Oakley Society is comprised of women leaders and philanthropists who, like Annie Oakley, play significant roles in shaping our communities and creating new horizons.[1] Also recognized at the award ceremony was Jo Rowan, receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award for her contributions in the field of dance and creative arts.

Meet Donna

At age 17, Donna Shirley earned her pilot’s license, won the Miss Wynnewood, OK crown, and competed in the Miss Oklahoma pageant. Following high school, she enrolled at the University of Oklahoma, obtaining a technical writing degree in 1962 and a bachelor’s degree from AME in 1965. She went on to enjoy a more than 30-year career at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and retired in 1998 as the Manager of the Mars Exploration Program. During her time at NASA, Ms. Shirley lead the team that built and successfully landed the Mars rover “Sojourner” in 1997. Ms. Shirley remarked that the was the lone female of 2000+ person group at JPL at that time. She then became assistant dean of the College of Engineering at OU, where in the past she was told that girls could never be engineers – she has fought successfully to help transform that attitude. After a brief introduction, the conversation with Ms. Shirley spearheaded into a discussion of the role and importance of women in engineering.

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It’s “easier” now…

Ms. Shirley gave clear and concise advice to all in attendance regarding the state of affairs for women in highly scientific fields like Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering. She said, “It’s easier [being a female in engineering] now but remember, you must be good [at whatever you’re doing].” She went on to explain that in the competitive hiring and retention environment of engineering, we must all strive to be the best at what we do. “Learning is ultimately important and not relying solely on grades”, she explained. Donna casually outlined one story she thought was important to note in which a disagreement developed between her and a male colleague. She handled the situation by relying only on the technical work she had done – outshining the negative attention only by being better. This an attitude she hopes all engineers (not only women) will adopt.

Congratulations!

We at the School of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering congratulate Donna Shirley on her award and applaud her for the way she continues to advocate for women in engineering. To celebrate her efforts, AME pledges to strive to always be an environment conducive to the success of everyone we interact with. Please join us as we recognize her hard work.

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  • By: Jawanza Bassue – MS Aerospace Engineering Candidate 2017

[1] http://nationalcowboymuseum.org/join-give/the-annie-oakley-society/

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