Drew KershenYou are invited to this week’s session of the Political Economy, Technological Innovation and Values Dream Course.  This week we’re welcoming guest lecturer Drew Kershen, OU College of Law emeritus professor.

BENEFITS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY
Wednesday March 13
10:30 a.m. – noon
Price Hall 2030

Human beings depend upon agriculture to produce food, fiber, fuel, and industrial products that humans need for survival and (hopefully) flourishing well-being.  As a consequence, agriculture (like energy) has a major impact on the use of natural resources and upon the planetary environment.  In recent years, there has arisen a wide-spread chorus that agriculture must be sustainable, though precisely what “sustainable” means and how it should be achieved are hotly contested.  The March 13 class will focus on agriculture and the concept of sustainability.  Participants are encouraged to read the assignments and be prepared to engage in discussion about the dilemmas existing in agriculture and sustainability and about the values (explicit and implicit) in the contested visions about agriculture’s future.

ABOUT PROFESSOR KERSHEN:

Professor Drew Kershen, who joined the OU law faculty in 1971, teaches courses on agricultural law, legal history, professional responsibility and water rights. In recent years, Professor Kershen has focused his teaching, research and lecturing on agricultural biotechnology law and policy.

After receiving his juris doctorate in 1968, he joined a private practice in Atlanta. In 1973, he was named a fellow in law and humanities at Harvard University. He has held visiting professorships at the universities of Kansas, Illinois, and Arkansas Little Rock. During the summer terms and semester intersessions, he has taught at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, Oklahoma City University, the University of Texas, and Texas Tech.

Kershen is coauthor of Farm Products Financing and Filing Service, written in 1990 with J. Thomas Hardin. He has authored more than 40 other book chapters, grant reports, and law review articles.

READ-AHEAD MATERIAL:

Instead of a straight lecture, Professor Kershen plans to engage the participants in dialog.  For this dialog to be effective, he has provided some read ahead material, linked below:

Food crisis will prompt GM foods rethink Mar 2013

Contested Vision — Kershen Conf Paper ver 2

Mark Lynas Lecture Dream Course

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For Additional Information, visit http://www.ou.edu/content/coe/ame/research/dream_course_2013 or contact Farrokh Mistree at 405.325. 2438 or farrokh.mistree@ou.edu

The lecture is complementary and open to the public. The University of Oklahoma is an equal-opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Sarah Warren at (405) 325-1715.

We hope to see you there!

Mark HalleYou are invited to this week’s session of the Political Economy, Technological Innovation and Values Dream Course.  This week we’re welcoming guest lecturer Mark Halle.

Mark Halle is the executive director of the European organization of the International Institute for Sustainable Development. He lectures, writes and publishes frequently on issues relating to sustainable development. He is founder and former Chairman of the Board of the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development. Throughout his career, he has worked with the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, the United Nations Environment Programme, the World Wildlife Fund International and the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Mark was born in the United States, but grew up in Switzerland. He took a degree in history and French from Tufts University and a postgraduate degree in history from the University of Cambridge.

Mark is scheduled to give two talks.

 

REBOOTING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Wednesday March 6, 10:30 a.m. – noon
Price Hall 2030

Nobody actively wants a form of development that carries the seeds of its self-destruction.  Especially since we know how to avoid it.  Yet if sustainable development is widely accepted as a goal we are, as a planet, headed in the opposite direction.  Why that is and what we can do about it is the subject of this lecture.

 

PUBLIC LECTURE – POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Wednesday March 6, 6:30 p.m.
Devon Energy Hall 120

It is commonplace for our leaders to say one thing and to do something entirely different.  They publicly embrace sustainable development and then give priority to action that undermines sustainability.  The reasons lie not simply with the hypocrisy and short-sightedness of politicians.  There are real and easily identifiable reasons for this.  Unless these are addressed it is hard to see how sustainable development will advance.  Happily, we now have an ever-clearer picture of what the transition will require.

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For Additional Information, visit http://www.ou.edu/content/coe/ame/research/dream_course_2013 or contact Farrokh Mistree at 405.325. 2438 or farrokh.mistree@ou.edu

Both talks are complementary and open to the public. The University of Oklahoma is an equal-opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Sarah Warren at (405) 325-1715.

We hope to see you there!

 

Carl Pope photoYou are invited to this week’s session of the Political Economy, Technological Innovation and Values Dream Course.  Our featured speaker is former Sierra Club executive director Carl Pope and current principal of Inside Straight Strategies.

Date:  February 27, 2013.
Time:  10:30AM to Noon.
Location:  Price Hall 2030

Title:  Innovation and Rights; Rigged Markets and Sustainability.  The Conflict we Can’t Resolve

Synopsis:  Carl Pope will employ a rights-based frame to the problem of sustainability, pointing out that if we genuinely tried to apply pure free market rules, in which all transaction were voluntarily agreed to by all whose rights are effected, innovation, which by its nature tramples existing rights in unanticipated and involuntary ways, would grind to halt — but sustainability would be ensured as a practical matter, because activities which infringe on the interests of the future invariably have dissenters victims in the present as well.

 

Date:  February 27, 2013.
Time:  6:30PM.
Location:  Devon Energy Hall 120

Public Lecture:  Extraction vs. Development.  Why technology and innovation make war on property rights and sustainability — and why free market ideology doesn’t help.

Synopsis:  Natural resources, and ecosystem services, pose problems that no version of conventional economics — however Chicago School or Keynsian it might be — has honestly confronted The real conflict is not between development and sustainability.  It’s between extraction and development, and between property rights and innovation.  These conflicts cannot be resolved.  They can only be managed.  Blind faith in free market ideology makes the problem worse.  But taking market principals seriously, and seeing where they take us, opens up some new opportunities.

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For Additional Information, visit http://www.ou.edu/content/coe/ame/research/dream_course_2013 or contact Farrokh Mistree at 405.325. 2438 or farrokh.mistree@ou.edu

Both talks are complementary and open to the public. The University of Oklahoma is an equal-opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Sarah Warren at (405) 325-1715.

We hope to see you there!

 

Bergey WindPower in Norman has a job opening for an engineering intern!

Job Function:

  • Engineering Drafting & Design position.
  • Review manufacturing BOM’s
  • Assist with prototype design & build.

Requirements:

  • A working knowledge of Solid Works 3-D modeling software.

For information about this paid internship, contact Dr. Karl Bergey, CEO of Bergey WindPower and former AME professor at kbergey@bergey.com.

 

 

 

You are invited to this week’s session of the Political Economy, Technological Innovation and Values Dream Course.  Our featured speaker is former United Nations director for the Division of Sustainable Development and lead author on the Nobel Prize-winning panel on climate change, Tariq Banuri, Ph.D.

Professor Banuri is giving two talks:

 

RESOLVING THE CLIMATE-DEVELOPMENT DILEMMA
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 10:30 a.m. – noon Price Hall 2030

Conventional climate policy has consistently envisaged the threat in terms of what economists call a zero-sum game, to wit, there is a finite atmospheric space available, and the goal of climate agreements is to agree on proportioning it between the North and the South (or further divisions thereof). Not surprisingly, the result has been a total impasse, neither side having enough condign power or moral authority to impose a solution. Admittedly, there is talk of technological alternatives, but these remain on the sidelines, i.e., as options that will emerge once the finite space has been allocated. The argument advanced in the attached paper is that (a) this is not how things work; (b) the better option is to shift the focus from “space allocation” to “technology incentivization”; and (c) here is how it can be done.

 

EARTHLAND: THE WORLD AS A SINGLE COUNTRY
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 6:30 p.m.   Devon Energy Hall 120

In this talk Professor Banuri will focus on the implications of treating the entire world as the unit of analysis for addressing current and emerging challenges. The talk will bear upon the resolution of current policy dilemmas (including climate, energy, and development) and also help articulate the intricate nexus between politics, economics, and technology.

 

Dr. Banuri is a professor at the College of Architecture + Planning at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He is the former director of the Division for Sustainable Development of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, and served as Head of Office of the Conference Secretary-General for the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio20).

Previously he served as a Senior Fellow and Director of Future Sustainability Programme at Stockholm Environment Institute. He was a Coordinating Lead Author on the Nobel Prize-winning Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change.

He started his career in the Civil Service of Pakistan and held several key positions including as the founding Executive Director of the Sustainable Development Policy Institute.

Dr. Banuri received his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.

 

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For Additional Information, visit http://www.ou.edu/content/coe/ame/research/dream_course_2013 or contact Farrokh Mistree at 405.325. 2438 or farrokh.mistree@ou.edu

Both talks are complementary and open to the public. The University of Oklahoma is an equal-opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Sarah Warren at (405) 325-1715.

We hope to see you there!

 

The Baker Hughes 21st Century Co-Op at the University of Oklahoma School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering is a five year BS/MS degree program in mechanical engineering aimed at developing technical competencies and meta-competencies needed by engineers to hit the road running and succeed in the oil and gas industry.  In addition to core courses in mechanical engineering, the curriculum includes customized courses jointly offered by company engineers and faculty during summer internships, a senior capstone experience and graduate theses that are of relevance to the sponsoring company, and graduate cross-disciplinary courses.  For additional information see attached.

Important Dates:
Application Deadline: February 15, 2013 (Submit at FH 212)
Interview with Baker Hughes: March 1-March 10, 2013
Selection Decision: March 15, 2013

For More Information Contact:
Professor Farrokh Mistree
Professor Zahed Siddique

Baker Hughes Co-op Form

BHI_ME_21stCenCoop_SalientFeatures_013113

 


 

The staff from State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers & Land Surveyors will be on the OU campus to register students and answer questions about their application for the April 13, 2013 Fundamentals of Engineering Exam.

When:
Monday, January 28- 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Where:
Carson Engineering Bldg – 1st floor

What to bring:
$50 check or money order made out to: Ok State Board for PE & LS
Typewritten Completed application from the website www.pels.ok.gov.  Click on Applications & Forms/ Engineer Intern (FE Exam) Application Forms.

Who Qualifies:
Students with 90 hours towards their engineering or related science degree

General Exam Info:
Exam Date – Saturday, April 13 – OU Campus
Cut-off date for receiving applications – February 1

If you can’t make it to sign-up day, mail your application to:
State Board for PE & LS
201 NE 27th Street , Room 120
Oklahoma City, OK 73105

For more information:
E-mail sandrews@pels.ok.gov

 

You are invited to join us next semester to explore a dilemma faced by people around the world:  How do we as a society advance technologically and politically while also doing what’s right for the environment?

How we answer this question will ultimately define our generation.  With so much at stake, what are the ideal methods for identifying, examining and communicating these issues?

This innovative dream course comes from the collaboration between OU engineering professor Farrokh Mistree and philosophy professor Edward Sankowski.  Providing additional knowledge is Aban Marker Kabraji, Asia regional director the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The seminar is complementary and open to students and members of the public

OU undergraduate and graduate students of any major wanting to take the class for credit can enroll in the course: AME 4971/5971.001.

Those interested in a three-credit Philosophy can request enrollment in PHIL 4990 Independent Study, or PHIL 5990 Independent Study, and will be required to do additional work. Contact Dr. Sankowski at esankowski@ou.edu or 325-0321 for more information.

To learn more about the dream course, visit http://www.ou.edu/content/coe/ame/research/dream_course_2013.html.

AME graduate student Arun Balakrishnan created this internet meme.  We think it describes many of our students and alums!  What do you think?

meme

Farrokh Mistree award

AME Director and LA Comp Chair Farrokh Mistree’s passion is to have fun while providing an opportunity for his students to learn how to define and achieve their dreams.  He can often be heard throughout corridors of Felgar Hall urging students to get advanced degrees, loudly exclaiming, “Being a professor is the best job in the world!”

Mistree’s success as an engineer and educator was recognized once again this year when he was named a 2012 distinguished alumnus of his alma mater, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.  He accepted the award in India from Shri Pranab Mukherjee, president of India.

This commendation was bestowed to a select group of alumni.   Among the other recipients are deans and directors of colleges, presidents of large corporations, and researchers on the forefront of discoveries in fields like technology, engineering and medicine.

“This is a great honor,” said Mistree.  “To be recognized by the institution that was the foundation for my career, and to be named among such an esteemed group of individuals, is at once humbling and an immense honor.”

In 1967 Mistree received a bachelor’s of technology degree with honors in naval architecture from IIT Kharagpur.  While a student, he helped found a monthly news magazine called IMPACT, and was later asked to serve as editor-in-chief of Udhyog, an annual magazine.  He was the recipient of the General Proficiency Award and received the Best Thesis in Naval Architecture Award.

Mistree went on to receive a Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of California at Berkley.    Prior to coming to the University of Oklahoma, Norman he spent 17 years at the Georgia Institute of Technology Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, and served as the school’s associate chair.

Throughout his long and prestigious career, he has co-authored two textbooks, one monograph, and more than 350 technical papers dealing with the design of mechanical, thermal and structural systems, ships and aircraft.  He has supervised 28 doctoral students and more than 50 master’s students, all of whom are well-placed around the world.  Twelve of his doctoral students are pursuing highly successful careers in academia.  He mentored two students who now own several for-profit colleges in Orissa, India.

 

 

 

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