aiaa-asme-ame-symposium-2017AME faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students attended the 37th Oklahoma AIAA/ASME Symposium at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 15, 2017. AME students contributed 15 technical presentations to the symposium. AME faculty, Drs. Chung-Hao Lee and Yingtao Liu, served as session chairs and led technical discussions in their session.

The Oklahoma AIAA/ASME Symposium is an annual student conference in the State of Oklahoma. Students majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineering from the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and University of Tulsa present their research at this conference. This is a prestigious opportunity for OU AME students to publicize their research and prepare for their academic / industrial careers.

 

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The inaugural OU Giving Day was February 28, 2017. It was a 24-hour online fundraiser for scholarships to give everyone the opportunity to make an impact in the lives of OU students.

The funds raised on OU Giving Day go directly to the Gallogly College of Engineering unrestricted scholarship fund. Scholarships through this fund will be awarded to undergraduates and graduate students in any of the College’s seven schools of any major and awarded in 2017.

Gallogly College swept 2 of the 3 University competitions and will receive an additional $2,000, bringing the OU Giving Day total to $30,386! This means that 30 students will receive a scholarship this fall, and YOU made that possible.

1st Place: Most New Donors, with 138. 62% of those that gave to GCoE made their first gift!

1st Place: Most Dollars Raised

Each department within Gallogly College competed to raise the most money and the results are in!

1st Place – Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering 

2nd Place – Computer Science 

3rd Place – Industrial and Systems Engineering

Our very own Director Altan donated and even made a video to encourage others to participate.

Thank you to everyone who donated!

At the Max Westheimer Airport on April 11, 2017, The Norman Chamber of Commerce Aviation/Transportation Committee hosted OU Aerospace Engineering Seniors Kevin Murray and Seth Eilerts of the OU Crimson Skies Design, Build, Fly (DBF) competition team. Also in attendance was Dr. Thomas Hays – the faculty advisor the DBF team who made a special appeal to the committee to involve the University in its conversations around UAVs.

Murray and Eilerts presented to the committee, airport staff and OU faculty their design and plans for the upcoming competition in Tucson, AZ and engaged in a discussion about UAVs (also popularly referred to as “drones”) in the local area. The staff of the Max Westheimer Airport (KOUN) commented on the popularity of drones in airspace across America and the FAA’s efforts to regulate their use. The airport staff further alluded to one recent incident that saw a small recreational unmanned vehicle crashing unexpectedly onto a runway – at the time of comment, the owner had not been identified. Murray and Eilerts detailed DBF’s approach to design, construction and testing of this and previous year’s aircrafts, while reminding all in attendance of their safety record and willingness to be a part of the greater conversation in Norman concerning UAV usage.

They reported this year’s design is being “lightweight and portable” as it folds into a tube for transportation and must be flight ready after removal without the use of tools. The presenters went into detail on how the design was optimized, multiple builds were implemented and tested, and furthermore predicted a favorable outcome at this year’s competition. The committee members wished the team well and reminded them of their support for the team’s endeavors.

This year’s AIAA DBF Flyoff Competition will be held in Tucson, AZ from April 20 – 23. The OU team will set off next week for a road trip to the venue. Follow the OU School of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering Facebook Page for updates from the team at competition. This year’s team is following last year’s 5th place overall from 80 teams from across the world including the University of Texas, Georgia Institute of Technology, Cornell University, University of Southern California, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cairo University, Johns Hopkins University, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and many more[1].

Story & Photos By: Jawanza Bassue (M.S. Aerospace Engineering, May 2017)

[1] https://blogs.ou.edu/ame/2016/04/20/crimson-skies-places-5th-at-aiaa-dbf-competition/

Salma Mahzoon, one of our amazing AME graduate students, won 3rd place at the OU-OUHSC Biomedical Engineering Symposium on Friday, March 24, 2017! There were 210 registrations, and she was selected from among 58 abstracts, based on a review of the abstract and independent judges who met the students at their posters and asked questions.

 

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Salma Mahzoon presenting at the 1st OU-OUHSC Biomedical Engineering Symposium Poster Session

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The Norman graduate students presenting at the 1st OU-OUHSC Biomedical Engineering Symposium Poster Session!

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Salma Mahzoon – 3rd place in the 1st OU-OUHSC Biomedical Engineering Symposium Poster Competition.
From left to right: Darrin Akins, Salma Mahzoon, Michael Detamore, Lei Ding — with Salma Mahzoon at OU Medical Center/ Nicholson Tower.

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The 1st OU-OUHSC Biomedical Engineering Symposium Poster Competition Winners!
From left to right: Darrin Akins, Jakob Townsend, Pratik Samant, Salma Mahzoon, Michael Detamore, Lei Ding.

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Scalewings’ P51 mustang wing test

Dr. Hays’ Aerospace Structures class tested their UAV Wing Structural Design and Destruction projects on March 24, 2017 in the Rawls Engineering Practice Facility.

The task description was to design the structure of an assigned UAV wing outer mold line.  These wings were placed in a table testing mount and loaded with sandbags corresponding to the lift distribution across the wing.  While this is an older method of testing, it is still very much in use today and serves as a very definitive demonstration of strength. The objective was to construct a suitable wing structure to carry the defined load while keeping the overall structure as light as possible.

OU International Admissions and Recruitment created an international recruitment video. The video features AME student Dickens Mugumya. He speaks about being from Uganda and his experience with the Aerospace Engineering program at OU. Check it out!

“Ram is a Business major from India. Lamis is an International Studies major from Egypt. Sophie is a Public Relations major from Germany. And Dickens is an Aerospace Engineering major from Uganda. What do all of these students have in common? The University of Oklahoma brought each of them from vastly different corners of the globe to our campus to contribute, learn, and make this world a better place. Watch to find out more!”

ABOUT LEAN CELL ADVISING

Students must sign up for a 30-minute block using iAdvise to prevent long wait times. All advising sessions will be held in Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200. When students arrive, they should have completed all tasks under “Know Before You Go” below.

All students must attend Lean Cell Advising or students may not be able to enroll in courses until Fall 2017. 

LEAN CELL ADVISING + iADVISE

AME Students must sign up for advising with iAdvise. AME has designated a 30-minute block sign up for students. The appointment should only take approximately 10-15 minutes as long as student comes prepared. Please note, all students MUST SIGN-UP FOR A TIME WITH iADVISE IN ORDER TO BE ADVISED.

Follow the simple steps below to sign-up with iAdvise:

  1. Log in to http://iadvise.ou.edu using your 4×4 and password.
  2. Select the Department Level Advisement (AE or ME at the School of Aerosapce and Mechanical Engineering), then select Make Group Appointment. 
  3. Reserve an advising time slot (ex. 12:30 time is for 12:30-1:00pm time slot). You can only reserve one slot.
  4. Arrive at the beginning of your time slot. You will be seen sometime within that 30-minute time frame. The advising session should only take approximately 10-15 minutes if student comes prepared.
  5. If you do not reserve a time slot before attending Lean Cell Advising, you may not be seen if the time slot is full.
iAdvise
download icon iAdvise Step-by-Step
Download the iAdvise step-by-step PDF here:

ADVISING DATES

All AME Lean Cell Advising sessions will take place in the Rawl Engineering Practice Facility, Room 200.

  • Returning Seniors & National Merit Scholars: Tuesday, February 28th from 12:00-3:00pm
  • Sophomores & Pre-Med: Wednesday, March 1st from 1:00-4:00pm
  • Juniors: Thursday, March 2nd from 12:00-3:00PM
  • Freshmen: Monday, March 27th from 1:00-4:30PM

Unsure of your academic classification? Go to oZone > click the academic tab > click academic profile > select the current semester

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

  • Prepare a course plan in Degree Navigator by logging on to ozone.ou.edu (The course plans on oZone do not check for pre-requisites nor will it verify courses offered during a specific semester)
  • Bring prepared course plan, degree check sheet and degree flowchart with the classes you have taken checked off, current courses circled and courses you plan to take in Fall 2017 highlighted
  • If you are not prepared upon arrival, your time will not be guranteed
  • A staff member from the Williams Student Services Center will be in attendance to remove your advising hold and answer any enrollment/graduation questions
  • A Pre-Med representative will be in attendance on Wednesday, March 1st

OTHER INFORMATION

Freshmen are required to be advised by their University College, Athletics, or Honors/Scholars Advisor in order to be able to enroll.

Do you have questions or concerns about advising, classes, your current major or school in general?

Please know that aside from Lean Cell Advising, you are encouraged to meet with your College Advisor in the Williams Student Services Center (WSSC) any time you have questions, or concerns you wish to discuss in a one-on-one meeting. Lean Cell Advising is an advising process intended to provide a stream-lined process for meeting with your major faculty advisor while also addressing the multiple steps in theadvising/enrollment system without having to visit multiple offices and staff. HOWEVER, you can, and are encouraged to, meet with your WSSC advisor if you require or would benefit from more in-depth guidance and academic counseling. It’s easy to do! Log into: iadvise.ou.edu to access available appointment times for your specific advisor. Don’t see any openings? Click here to contact your WSSC advisor or call WSSC directly at (405) 325-4096.

Do you have questions about career fairs, graduate school, internships and co-ops? 

WSSC advisors are here to assist you with Career Counseling. We encourage you to take advantage of this guidance as you prepare for your future as an engineer!

QUESTIONS?

For more information or accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact Kate O’Brien at kobrien@ou.edu.

Dr. David P. Miller spoke at the 2017 Oklahoma City Joint Engineering Societies Banquet on February 23, 2017 at the Gaylord Student Center at Oklahoma Christian University in Edmond, Oklahoma.

The program featured Dr. David P. Miller, who since 1999 has been the Wilkonson Chair and Professor of Intelligent Systems based in the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) at the University of Oklahoma. Miller has a Bachelors in Astronomy from Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science/AI from Yale. His primary research areas are in mobility, the tradeoff between algorithm and mechanism, assistive technology and STEM education. Miller worked at NASA’s Ames Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for his work at JPL leading to the Mars Pathfinder Rover Mission. He is a founder of KISS Institute for Practical Robotics and their Botball Program. Miller is the faculty advisor for the OU Boomer Rocket Team and the Sooner Rover Team (SoRo). In the Fall of 2015, OU was competitively selected as one of eight universities to compete in the NASA RASC-AL Robo-Ops competition. The competition involves finding and retrieving designated samples from Mars and Lunar-like environments (at NASA JSC) while tele-operating the rover from a remote location (in our case, Norman OK). OU students designed and built the rover over the next 8 months and competed in May of 2016. This talk will discuss the team, their design and performance at the competition (Spoiler: we won).

According to Miller, after his “Rovers and OU Student Engineering Teams” presentation, several high school students that plan to attend the University of Oklahoma expressed interest in joining rover, rocket or space related student teams and were currently involved in robotics teams at their high school.

The Oklahoma Society of Professional Engineers (OSPE) Central/Southwest Chapter sponsored the banquet. This event was held in conjunction with Engineer’s Week that many Oklahoma engineering societies participate in. A number of students also attended the banquet, including participants in Engineer for a Day, Future Ciies, and MATHCOUNTS programs.

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Dr. Andrea L’Afflitto has recently published a new book titled A Mathematical Perspective on Flight Dynamics and Control. The book provides a mathematically rigorous description of flight dynamics complementing those presented from a physical perspective.

About this Book

This brief presents several aspects of flight dynamics, which are usually omitted or briefly mentioned in textbooks, in a concise, self-contained, and rigorous manner. The kinematic and dynamic equations of an aircraft are derived starting from the notion of the derivative of a vector and then thoroughly analyzed, interpreting their deep meaning from a mathematical standpoint and without relying on physical intuition. Moreover, some classic and advanced control design techniques are presented and illustrated with meaningful examples.

Distinguishing features that characterize this brief include a definition of angular velocity, which leaves no room for ambiguities, an improvement on traditional definitions based on infinitesimal variations. Quaternion algebra, Euler parameters, and their role in capturing the dynamics of an aircraft are discussed in great detail. After having analyzed the longitudinal- and lateral-directional modes of an aircraft, the linear-quadratic regulator, the linear-quadratic Gaussian regulator, a state-feedback H-infinity optimal control scheme, and model reference adaptive control law are applied to aircraft control problems. To complete the brief, an appendix provides a compendium of the mathematical tools needed to comprehend the material presented in this brief and presents several advanced topics, such as the notion of semistability, the Smith–McMillan form of a transfer function, and the differentiation of complex functions: advanced control-theoretic ideas helpful in the analysis presented in the body of the brief.

A Mathematical Perspective on Flight Dynamics and Control will give researchers and graduate students in aerospace control an alternative, mathematically rigorous means of approaching their subject.

About the Author:

The author is an assistant professor at the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering of The University of Oklahoma and is presently teaching a graduate course in flight control. Dr. L’Afflitto holds a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degree in aerospace engineering and an M.S. degree in Mathematics and his research is currently focused on optimal control theory and differential games theory with applications to aerospace control problems, such as fuel-optimal path planning and formation flying.

 

To purchase or learn more about this book, please visit: http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319474663

A group of students from Dr. Andrea L’afflitto’s Flight Controls class created the following video:

According to Dr. L’afflitto, this project consisted of designing an autopilot for a quadrotor using some modern, very aggressive control techniques. The purpose of this video is to show the results achieved graphically, however, the mathematical models, the control design problem and the numerical simulations have very deep roots.

“I am extremely proud of their work because these are all undergraduate students, but the quality and the mathematical complexity is the one of a graduate project,” said Dr. L’afflitto. “We all can imagine the impact of the development of such technology, considering the growing attention that OU is putting on the UAS technology.”

Video Transcript:

This video shows the result of a students’’ project developed as part of the AME 4513/5513 “Flight Controls” course at the University of Oklahoma in Fall 2016. A DJI F450 will inspect some buildings of OU’s main campus. The drone’s autopilot implements an algorithm based on Model Reference Adaptive Control.

An important feature of this simulation is that the quadrotor dynamics is not captured by a set of nonlinear differential equations, but it is deduced from a SimMechanics model of a DJI F450. This guarantees high accuracy of the results presented.

The adaptive control technology allows precise, aggressive maneuvers in the vicinity of obstacles, such as buildings.

[VIDEO]

Next, we compare the performance of a quadrotor (in white) implementing an adaptive control law and a quadrotor (in black) implementing a classic PID controller.

[VIDEO]

Created by: Blake Anderson

Riley Cotter

Jordan Logue

Kevin Murray Jr.

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