AME Faculty Profiles

We have amazing professors here at AME who love teaching and working with our students. This week, get to know these seven outstanding faculty members. 

Dr. Chung-Hao Lee

Dr. Lee’s research interests include Cardiovascular Biomechanics and Multiscale Computational Modeling. He teaches Solid Mechanics, Numerical Methods, Solid Mechanics Lab, and Biomechanics, and his favorite class in college was Finite Element Methods. In Dr. Lee’s free time, he enjoys watching TV and sports! Dr. Lee’s favorite thing about OU is working with students from various disciplines and his advice to students is to pay attention to the details and read instructions carefully.

Dr. Zahed Siddique

Dr. Siddique’s research interests include Engineering Education, Oil and Gas Component Characterization, Neuro-Responses to Creativity, and Product and Process Design. He teaches Principles of Design and Design Practicum. In college, he enjoyed programming courses. In Dr. Siddique’s free time, he likes to watch movies. His favorite thing about OU is working with students on projects involving design, manufacturing, and testing. Dr. Siddique recommends that students collaborate and cooperate with integrity.

 

Dr. Farrokh Mistree

Dr. Mistree is interested in defining the emerging frontier for the “intelligent” decision-based realization of complex (cyber-physical-social) systems when the computational models are incomplete and inaccurate. Applications: Healthcare, Rural Development (people living in extreme poverty), Education. He teaches Preparing for a Life in Academia, Designing for Open Innovation, Principles of Engineering Design, and Design Practicum (Capstone). In college, his favorite course was Architecture and Town Planning of Ancient Rome. His passion is to engage in activities that provide an opportunity for highly motivated and talented people (around the world) to learn how to define and achieve their dreams. Dr. Mistree’s favorite thing about OU is the flexibility proffered in the graduate curriculum.

His is advice to graduate students is that it doesn’t matter what topic you study; the details are going to be out of date pretty soon. What matters is what you learn by reflecting on what you do in your thesis/dissertation. Find a mentor who is keen to invest in educating (not just training) you. His advice to undergraduate students is that graduate education is typically free in the US for students who wish to pursue a graduate degree. Take at least one course that exposes you to research and then think deeply about pursuing a graduate degree. Plan on developing non-technical competencies for careers post-graduation. Dr. Mistree says, “Talk to me about graduate education.”

Dr. Chris Dalton

Dr. Dalton’s research interests are in STEM Outreach and he teaches Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, IC Engines Lab, Capstone, Design of Thermal/Fluid Systems, Solid Mechanics, and Freshman Engineering Experience. In college, his favorite class was Physics 1. He had an excellent professor that made the class very interactive and engaging. He uses structures from that class in his classes to this day. In his free time, he is a big sports fan. He follows the Sooners, the OKC Thunder, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the Atlanta Braves. He also enjoys going to the movies. As an alumnus of OU, his favorite thing about OU is getting to share past experiences with students and see how their experiences are similar and different from his. Dr. Dalton’s advice to students is to find activities to get involved in outside the classroom, like student organizations or research. Employers want to see a well-rounded student, not just an academically strong one.

Dr. Feng C. Lai

 

Dr. Feng C. Lai

Dr. Lai’s research interests include Heat Transfer, Enhanced Heat Transfer Using Electrical Field, Electrohydrodynamics, and Heat Transfer in Porous Media. He teaches Principles of Heat Transfer, Design of Thermal and Fluid Systems, Heat Transfer, and Thermodynamics, and his favorite course in college was Thermodynamics. In his free time, Dr. Lai enjoys traveling, watching movies, and listening to classical music. His favorite thing about OU is its good balance between academic and athletic programs. Dr. Lai’s advice for students is to balance their work and play.

 

 

Dr. David P. Miller

Dr. Miller’s research interests are Assistive technology, robot planning, robotics for STEM Education, localization, and planetary surface exploration. He teaches Programming, space science, and robotics, and his favorite course in college was Works of Mark Twain. In Dr. Miller’s free time, he enjoys reading and saltwater aquariums. His favorite thing about OU is Opera and his advice to students is to talk to users.

 

 

Dr. Pejman Kazempoor

Dr. Kazempoor’s research interests are Carbon Capture and Utilization, Sustainable Energy, Environmental Management, Energy Storage, and Electrochemical Energy Systems (Fuel Cells). He teaches Fluid Mechanics; Modeling and Simulation of Energy Systems. His favorite course from college was Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics. In his free time, he enjoys playing music. Dr. Kazempoor’s favorite thing about OU is its Diversity and Inclusion. His advice to students is that success is a process.

Applications are Open for the NASA JSC Pathways Program

 

The NASA JSC Pathways Program applications open today, September 14, 2020, and Abigail Moore, an AME student in the Pathways Program, wants to encourage other students to apply.

“I can’t recommend it enough to other OU engineering students,” Moore said. “I’ve met some of my best friends, learned things years ahead of my classes, and worked on things that will go to space before I graduate!”

“NASA is looking for well-rounded students who are self-motivated, passionate and want to join our ranks as we lead human space exploration. This position provides students with the opportunity to explore NASA careers and gain meaningful developmental work experience. The Pathways internship employment program is a co-op program where students rotate semesters between school and interning at Johnson Space Center working on projects from designing spacesuit helmets to teaching astronaut training classes to destructive battery testing. The Pathways program also provides the best path to a full-time job with the agency as a civil servant upon graduation,” Moore said.

Announcements are posted to www.usajobs.gov on 9/14/20 and will stay open for 1-2 days. Students can prepare to apply by developing a profile in USAJobs ahead of time, building their resume, and creating a notification for NASA Pathways Intern opportunities that will alert them when the announcements open. If anyone has any questions, they can visit the website or contact Abigail Moore directly at abbeymoore@ou.edu

How to Prepare

1. Go to USAJOBS.GOV to create an account. Click on ‘create a login.gov account’ in the orange box and follow the prompts. Once you have created your account on login.gov, click ‘continue’ to log back into USAJOBs.

2. Create a profile. Before you can apply, you will need to complete your profile. Select ‘Complete Profile.’

3. Build your Resume: After you complete your profile, you can build your resume.  It is key that you do this before the announcement comes out.

4. Set up a Job Alert: Create an alert through the “saved search” function. Saved searches will automatically search for jobs based on your search criteria and email you when there are new jobs available. Pathways announcements are listed as “Student Trainee” roles.

5. Once you have set up your alert, you will be notified when Pathways vacancies open. Once you find an opportunity, follow the instructions in the “How to Apply” section of the announcement.

One important note: Each job announcement will be considered closed at 10:59 p.m. CST on either the date that a specific number of applications are received or on 9/16/20, whichever occurs first.

You can find more info on the program, including qualifications, here: https://pathways.jsc.nasa.gov/

Dr. Lee Receives University Distinguished Teaching Award

Dr. Chung-Hao Lee was selected to receive the University Distinguished Teaching Award in this year’s Norman Campus Faculty Tribute Awards! The following passage was written by the University:

Since joining the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering in 2016, assistant professor Chung-Hao Lee has established an independent, multidisciplinary research program with a focus on experimental and computational biomechanics that has rapidly grown into one of the largest biomedical research groups within the Gallogly College of Engineering.

In the first three years of his tenure track, Lee has taught a wide variety of AME courses at the undergraduate level and has also developed innovative course materials by integrating his expertise in mechanics and cutting-edge research technology.

Lee has been recognized by his colleagues for his strong passion for student mentoring. Students engaged in undergraduate research projects under his guidance have demonstrated academic excellence through receipt of numerous awards, including the Grand Prize Award at Oklahoma Research Day at the Capitol and the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship.

Congratulations Dr. Lee for receiving this well-deserved award!

AME Graduate Student Award Winners Announced!

This month, AME announced the graduate students who will be receiving scholarships and fellowships for their hard work during the 2019-2020 school year. Graduate students recognized include:

Marathon Oil Scholarship:

Adam Flenniken

 

John E. Francis Scholarship:

Roshan Annam

Hootan Rahimi

 

Jim and Bee Close Scholarship:

Mohammad Abshirini

Alfredo Becerril Corral

Emmanuel Hakizimana

Anirban Mondal

Mohammad Naghashnejad

Fatema Tarannum

 

Frank Chuck Mechanical Engineering Scholarship:

Parisa Marashizadeh

 

W. Thomas Milam, Sr., Endowed Fellowship:

Tess Hartog

Blake Herren

 

Congratulations to these outstanding students for their achievements!

CellScale Biomaterials Testing Features Dr. Lee and His Publications

Dr. Chung-Hao Lee’s publications were featured in a recent newsletter by CellScale Biomaterials Testing for his work with the CellScale BioTester. The publications also showcase his research in cardiovascular biomechanics.

To view the webpage featuring Dr. Lee and his publications, click here. For more information about Dr. Lee’s Biomechanics and Biomaterials Design Laboratory (BBDL), click here.

Congratulations Dr. Lee!

 

Colton Ross Selected for the NSF GRF

Graduate Student Colton Ross was selected for the 2020 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Ross is a graduate student in the BBDL studying Mechanical Engineering.

During the program, Ross, “will be working under Dr. Chung-Hao Lee on the development of a multiscale computational model for one of the heart valves – the tricuspid valve.” They hope to gain, “a better understanding of the complex heart valve mechanics, which can eventually help towards patient-specific surgical planning or the refinement of current therapies.” Ross is looking forward to learning new things and sharing his ideas at research symposia or with fellow lab members.

Ross discovered his passion for research by working for course credit under his advisor, Dr. Lee. Ross said, “since then [his] passion has been fueled by the work and the people around [him] that make that work possible.”

“The AME department is full of extremely supportive people who want nothing more than for you to succeed, and they will provide any resources they can to make that possible,” Ross said.

Congratulations on this outstanding achievement, Colton!

2019-2020 Outstanding Student Award Recipients are Announced!

Outstanding student awards for the 2019-2020 school year include seniors Will Fossett and Riley Barnes, juniors Callen Koiner and Hunter Lau, and sophomores, Megan Fox and Abbey Moore.

      Outstanding Senior in Mechanical Engineering: Riley Barnes

Riley Barnes is currently the lead teaching assistant for Circuits 1 (DC Circuits), Circuits 2 (AC Circuits), and Electromechanical Systems.

After graduation, he plans to work full-time as a mechanical design engineer in the aerospace industry for L3 Harris Technologies at their Greenville, TX location.

“I initially discovered my passion for mechanical design and manufacturing during my sophomore year on the Sooner Rover team, when we designed and built a new rover. Since that time, professors and colleagues in the AME program have continued to push me to grow as an engineer and a professional.  Leveraging resources in the AME program I was able to obtain a design engineer internship with Terex Corporation and this experience reinforced my desire to work as a design engineer.  The technical knowledge and lessons I’ve learned in AME are truly invaluable and will remain with me throughout my career.

         Outstanding Senior in Aerospace Engineering: Will Fossett

 Will Fossett is part of Sigma Gamma Tau, the national aerospace engineering honor society. He is also a team member of OU’s DBF, where he worked on static stability analysis, structural analysis, and construction of the fuselage and spar for the team’s aircraft. Fossett is also the teaching assistant for AME 3333 Flight Mechanics.

After graduation, he will be working in the Electronics and Payloads division at Northrop Grumman in Oklahoma City.

“OU’s AME program has introduced us to each of the primary fields of aerospace, such as propulsion, structures, aerodynamics, and flight controls. These classes allowed us to experience the basics of these fields so that we can understand what fields we are interested in and have aptitudes for. By introducing us to many different aspects of aerospace, the OU AME program has allowed me to find the aspects of aerospace that truly interest me.”

     Outstanding Junior in Aerospace Engineering: Callen Koiner

After graduation, Callen Koiner plans on furthering his education by pursuing a Master’s degree so that he can better understand how to design components for the next generation of air and space vehicles to help push humanity further than ever before.

“Ever since I was a kid, I have always been interested in the science of flight. I chose Aerospace Engineering because it allowed me to develop an understanding of all the different mechanisms of flight through the help of many different professors and faculty during my time at OU.”

   Outstanding Junior in Mechanical Engineering: Hunter Lau

After graduation, Hunter Lau hopes to enroll in the University of Oklahoma Medical school to pursue an MD.

“I am studying mechanical engineering in order to have the broadest and representative understanding of the Engineering field! I enjoy learning the variety of topics Mechanical Engineering has to offer including circuits, solid/fluid mechanics, heat transfer, biomechanics, and computational analysis.”

Outstanding Sophomore in Aerospace Engineering: Megan Fox

In the future, Megan Fox hopes to work on military aircraft and bring innovative ideas to an ever-evolving field.

“My natural curiosity and instinctive need to explore the universe have led me to know that aerospace engineering has always been my calling. Choosing my major may have been a simple decision, but I fell in love with it in a way I never expected. I came to love my major because of the way that it requires creativity. When it comes to exploring the universe, there will always be more questions than answers, and I’ve learned that sometimes the best solutions come from the most unexpected ideas. Building gliders and rockets has shown me that there is never an exact solution, but applying ideas and principles in an innovative way is how progress is made. Every time I see my ideas in action, I am reassured that I am in the right major.”

Outstanding Sophomore in Mechanical Engineering: Abbey Moore

After graduation, Abbey Moore plans to continue working at NASA’s Johnson Space Center where she can work on the next generation of spacesuits and support NASA’s return to the Moon.

“I’m studying mechanical engineering because I love the range of tools– from fluids and solids to design and analysis– that it gives me to address complex and dynamic problems.”

Dr. SeungYeon Kang Gives Seminar over Advanced Laser-Materials-Processing Techniques for Nanofabrication of Functional Materials and Energy Harvesting Devices

SeungYeon Kang, Ph.D. presented a seminar Friday, March 6, over, “Advanced Laser-Materials-Processing Techniques for Nanofabrication of Functional Materials and Energy Harvesting Devices.” Dr. Kang is a Program Manager for NSF’s SHAP3D additive manufacturing center at the University of Connecticut.

Abstract: Increasing number of novel materials, structures and device are being designed every day to revolutionize our future. Accordingly, new fabrication methods to complement the designs must be developed for actual realization of the devices. In this talk I’ll start by discussing the use of ultrafast lasers for advanced materials processing techniques and the significance of developing new nanofabrication methods for cost-effective manufacturing and rapid prototyping with high accuracy. The focus of my talk will be on a novel direct laser writing technique that enables fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric nanocomposite structures of tunable dimensions ranging from hundreds of nanometers to micrometers. This true 3D patterning technique utilizes nonlinear optical interactions between chemical precursors and femtosecond pulses to go beyond the limitations of conventional fabrication techniques that require multiple postprocessing steps and/or are restricted to fabrication in two dimensions. The first part of the talk will end with a further discussion on possible applications including metamaterials, graphene-based devices and etc. In the shorter second part of the talk, I’ll introduce a relatively new material of research interest called piezoelectrochemical materials and another advanced laser-materials-processing technique that utilizes laser induced forward transfer (LIFT). I’ll end with a discussion on how one can use these two research areas to develop energy harvesting devices that convert ambient mechanical energy into electrochemical energy.

Biography: Dr. SeungYeon Kang is currently the program manager for NSF’s SHAP3D additive manufacturing center at University of Connecticut. Her research interests are focused on advanced laser materials processing techniques, fundamental principles and application of light-matter interaction, nanofabrication and energy technology. She obtained her B.A. degree from Cornell University in chemical engineering and received her Ph.D. degree in applied physics from Harvard University, where she focused on ultrafast laser processing of materials and developed a novel 3D nanofabrication technique. After her graduate studies, she worked at Samsung SDI as a senior research engineer on lithium ion batteries and at Princeton University as a postdoctoral research associate. Her various research resulted in several patents and she is the recipient of Samsung SDI Scholarship, Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE) research Fellowship and Princeton Postdoctoral Fellowship in scientific writing.

Dr. Guru Dinda Gives Seminar over Accelerated Discovery of New Ni-based Superalloys Via Additive Manufacturing for Advanced Turbine Engines

On Monday, March 2, Dr. Guru Dinda gave a seminar over, “Accelerated Discovery of New Ni-based Superalloys Via Additive Manufacturing for Advanced Turbine Engines.” Dr. Dinda is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Wayne State University.

Abstract: Due to the ever-increasing demands for energy efficiency in gas turbines for power plants and aircraft engines, new Ni-based superalloys remain under development. Our current level of theoretical and empirical understanding does not usually permit one to predict the structures and resulting properties of these multicomponent materials. Consequently, the discovery and optimization of many materials comprise trial-and-error experiments. Given the vast universe of potential alloys that can be created by combining various elements from the periodic table, the conventional method of synthesizing and testing samples one at a time is too slow for exploring the broad range of novel materials. Here I disclose a high-throughput alloy development procedure based on the direct laser metal deposition principle coupled with CALPHAD-based solidification modeling that will expedite the alloy discovery process by 100 to 1000 times compared to the current one at a time alloy development practice. In the current alloy development research, the testing of the mechanical properties of the new alloys comes at the later part of the alloy development process. Tensile testing of thousands of conventional test specimen requires a long time and adequate resources. This limits the exploration of a very large set of alloy library. Here I propose a sample fabrication and testing methodology of thousands of miniaturized tensile test samples in a few days at the early stage of the alloy development. It is expected that the proposed high-throughput alloy development technique will be used extensively to explore various alloy libraries to discover many new high-performance materials for structural and functional applications.

Biography: Dr. Guru Dinda is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Wayne State University (WSU). Dr. Dinda’s research interest is directed toward fundamental understanding of the additive manufacturing processes to reduce lead-time for concept-to-product manufacturing for government and industries. Dr. Dinda has developed a laser additive manufacturing (LAM) facility at WSU that combines laser cladding with rapid prototyping into a solid freeform fabrication process. Dr. Dinda led the development of various LAM processes for manufacturing and remanufacturing of a variety of high-value components made of 4340 steel, Al 4047, Al 7050, Al 7075, Cu-30Ni, Cu-38Ni, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 738, Rene 108, Haynes 282, Ti-6Al-4V, GRCop 84, Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3
using LAM technology. He earned a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Saarland, Saarbrucken, Germany in 2006. Dr. Dinda has published 37 journal articles that have been cited more than 1600 times. He also serves as an associate editor for Advances in Materials Science and Engineering Journal, and International Journal of Material Science and Research.

Dr. Sergey Averkin Gives Seminar Over Kinetic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Phenomena in Partially Ionized Plasmas

Sergey Averkin, Ph.D., a Research Scientist from Tech-X Corporation, gave a seminar Friday, February 28. He spoke about, “Kinetic Simulations of Non-equilibrium Phenomena in Partially Ionized Plasmas.”

Abstract: Partially ionized plasmas have many applications in science and engineering. The examples of applications include space propulsion, material processing including production of nanomaterials, ion sources, display panels, medicine. Modeling and simulation of non-equilibrium chemically reacting plasmas is a challenging problem owing to the presence of complicated plasma chemistry and coupling between volume, surface, and transport non-equilibrium processes. Simulation approaches span from volume averaged global models that incorporate thousands of chemical reactions and include simplified assumptions regarding transport to computationally expensive kinetic simulation methods that allow to calculate detailed information of plasma transport and usually employ simplified chemical models to speedup simulations.

The first part of the talk presents a Global Enhanced Vibrational Kinetic (GEVKM) model and its application to the simulation of an RF discharge chamber of a new High Current Negative Hydrogen Ion Source developed by Busek Co. Inc. and WPI. The GEVKM is supplemented by a comprehensive set of surface and volumetric chemical processes (22 species and more than 1000 chemical reactions) governing vibrational and ionization kinetics of hydrogen plasmas. The model is computationally efficient. It was used in parametric studies with thousands of points in parameter space.

The second part of the talk outlines new developments in the Particle-in-Cell and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo methods (PIC/DSMC) that are used to model partially ionized plasmas and rarefied gases that are described by kinetic equations coupled with the Poisson equation. The PIC/DSMC method can provide detailed information of the distribution functions of plasma components in complicated geometries. The applications of the PIC/DSMC method to simulations of flows inside nanonozzles and around CubeSat are presented. In addition, novel simulations of plasma assisted growth of nanoparticles using PIC/DSMC method are discussed.

Biography: Dr. Sergey N. Averkin received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in applied mathematics and physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, Russia, in 2007 and 2009, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in aerospace engineering from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Worcester, MA,  in 2015. From 2015 to 2016, he was a Post-Doctoral Fellow and an Adjunct Teaching Professor at WPI. In 2018 Dr. Averkin was a Research Associate at the University of Colorado Boulder. Currently he is a Research Scientist at the Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO, USA. His current research interests include advanced numerical simulations of nonequilibrium phenomena in chemically reacting rarefied gases and plasmas. Applications of such simulations include space propulsion, mass and heat transport at micro and nano scales, ion sources, plasma processing. Dr. Averkin is a member of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).